“Justice Ginsburg Urges New Citizens to Make America Better”

“Bedecked in a multicolored collar that reflected the diversity of the 201 new citizens before her, Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg presided over a naturalization ceremony on Tuesday at the New-York Historical Society, treating her rapt audience to a history lesson, one crackling with life and liberty.” L. Robbins, The New York Times

ESL Voices Lesson Plan for this post with Answer Key

Ruth Bader Ginsburg, associate justice of the Supreme Court, center. Credit Chang W. Lee:The New York Times

Excerpt: “Justice Ginsburg Urges New Citizens to Make America Better”  By Liz Robbins, The New York Times

“Justice Ginsburg told them that her own father arrived in this country at 13 with no fortune and no ability to speak English, and yet, she would soon be administering the oath of citizenship to them as a member of the highest court in the land.

Across the packed rows of seats at the historical society’s Upper West Side theater sat people from 59 countries, with first names like Islam, Hussein, Kazi, Angie and Sunday, and with professions as diverse as pastors and pediatric cancer doctors. Two men from Guinea sat in the third row and learned they were both named Mamadou Alpha Diallo, both taxi drivers.  ‘We are a nation made strong by people like you,’ Justice Ginsburg said.

Justice Ginsburg and new citizens. NYT

It seemed only appropriate that the Brooklyn-born jurist known by her fans as the Notorious R.B.G. (a play on the rapper Notorious B.I.G.) delivered her remarks at the oldest museum in the city. Justice Ginsburg, 85, is believed to be the first Supreme Court justice to take part in a naturalization ceremony in New York in recent years, even though the court does not keep detailed records of officiating appearances.

President Barack Obama embraces Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg before the President’s State Of The Union address on Tuesday, Jan. 20, 2015

‘Because I’ve seen her on the news and the wonderful things she has done for people and now getting to see her live, I had tears coming down my eyes,’ said Sunday Aito, 50, originally from Nigeria.

Despite the contentious climate surrounding immigration — and who gets admission to the country — Justice Ginsburg made no mention of the Trump administration in her remarks. The Supreme Court will hear arguments this year about the legality of [Trump’s] travel ban; in a December Supreme Court decision that allowed the third version to continue during the legal challenges, both Justices Ginsburg and Sonia Sotomayor dissented…Justice Ginsburg acknowledged that the United States was at its outset an imperfect union, and is still beset by poverty, low voting numbers and by the ‘struggle to achieve greater understanding of each other across racial, religious and socio-economic lines.’

Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg.

She urged its newest citizens to vote and to foster unity. ‘We have made huge progress, but the work of perfection is scarcely done,’ she said.”

ESL Voices Lesson Plan for this post

NOTE: Lessons can also be used with native English speakers.

Level: Intermediate – Advanced


Language Skills: Reading, writing, and speaking. Vocabulary and grammar activities are included.


Time: Approximately 2 hours.


Materials: Student handout (from this lesson) and access to news article.


Objective: Students will read and discuss the article
with a focus on improving reading comprehension and learning new vocabulary. At the end of the lesson students will express their personal views on the topic through group work and writing.

I. Pre-Reading Activities

KWL Chart

The K-W-L chart is used to activate students’ background knowledge of a

topic in order to enhance their comprehension skills.

Directions: Have students use the KWL chart to list the information they already know about Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg.  Later in the Post- Reading segment of the lesson, students can fill in what they’ve learned about the topic.

Advanced K-W-L chart.Intervention for Reading

 

II. While Reading Activities

Word Inference

Directions: Students are to infer the meanings of the words in bold taken from the article. They may use a dictionary, thesaurus, and Word Chart for assistance.

  1. She would soon be administering the oath of citizenship.
  2. It seemed only appropriate that the Brooklyn-born jurist presided over the ceremony.
  3. Despite the contentious climate surrounding immigration the president was not mentioned.
  4. After officiating at the ceremony, she spoke with participants.
  5. To preside over a naturalization ceremony at the historical society was Justice Ginsburg’s idea.
  6. Many green card holders are studying for the naturalization test.
  7. Justice Ginsburg proved inspirational to men and women.
  8. She is a champion of women’s rights and equality.
  9. Ambati is a pediatric cancer specialist at a Cancer Center.
  10. Yusif Abubakari, 42, born in Ghana, was struck by Justice Ginsburg’s humbleness.

Reading Comprehension

Fill-ins

Directions: Place students in groups and after they have read the entire article, have them complete the following sentences  taken from the article. They can use the words and terms from the list provided, or provide their own terms. They are to find the meanings of any new vocabulary.

As a ___of women’s rights and___, Justice Ginsburg proved ___to men and women in the audience. Pranitha Mantrala, 35, a ___originally from___, said the message was clear: “I think we can achieve anything.” She became a ___along with her___, Srikanth Ambati, 38, who is a___cancer specialist at Memorial-Sloan Kettering Cancer Center. “It meant a lot for me, especially her ___coming from such a___, and her going into such a high profession,” Dr. Mantrala said. “It’s adorable.”

WORD LIST:  citizen,  pediatric, husband,  equality, India, inspirational, background, champion, physician,  parents,

 

Grammar Focus: Structure and Usage

Directions: The following groups of sentences are from the article. One of the sentences in each group contains a grammatical  error. Students are to identify the sentence (1, 2, or 3 ) from each group that contains the grammatical error.

I

  1. Justice Ginsburg will mark her 25th year  in the bench in August.
  2. To preside over a naturalization ceremony at the historical society was Justice Ginsburg’s idea.
  3. She said that she had read a New York Times article about the program.

II

  1. The Citizenship Project offers free classes to green card holders.
  2. Justice Ginsburg was careful to present this nation as one that are heavily into self-improvement.
  3. Justice Ginsburg acknowledged that the United States was at its outset an imperfect union.

III

  1. She urged it’s newest citizens to vote and to foster unity.
  2. As a champion of women’s rights and equality, Justice Ginsburg proved inspirational to men and women in the audience.
  3. “May God bless her and give her more life and prosperity.”

III. Post Reading Activities

WH-How Questions

Directions: Have students use the  WH-question format to discuss or to write the main points from the article.

Who or What is the article about?

Where does the action/event take place?

When does the action/event take place?

Why did the action/event occur?

How did the action/event occur?

KWL Chart

Directions:  Have students  fill in the last column of the KWL chart if they used one in the pre-reading segment of this lesson.

Discussion for Comprehension /Writing

Directions: Place students in groups and have them  discuss the following questions about the United States government. Students may explore information on the web.  Afterwards, have the groups share their thoughts as a class. To reinforce the ideas, students can write an essay on one of the topics mentioned.

The U.S. government has three branches—the executive branch, the legislative branch, and the judicial branch. The government was set up this way so no one person would have too much power. With three branches, each branch balances out the others.

  1. Name and describe the powers for each branch of government.
  2. Under which branch of government does Justice Ruth Ginsburg preside?
  3. How many supreme court justices are there?
  4. The article states, Despite the contentious climate surrounding immigration — and who gets admission to the country — Justice Ginsburg made no mention of the Trump administration in her remarks. The Supreme Court will hear arguments this year about the legality of President Trump’s travel ban.” From this comment who has the authority to admit (or deny) immigrants into the U.S.?

 

3-2-1-Writing

Directions: Allow students 5 minutes to write down three new ideas they’ve learned about the topic from the reading,  two things they did not understand in the reading, and one thing they would like to know that the article did not mention. Review the responses as a class.

ANSWER KEY

The Royal Wedding is Near and Americans Are Excited!

“Nearly 23 million Americans watched Prince William and Kate Middleton’s wedding in 2011. Royal families, especially royal weddings, mimic fairytales, Katherine Jellison, a professor of history and a wedding expert, said, and they represent a ‘distant family fantasy figure.’ Prince Harry and actress Meghan Markle announced their engagement in November, and with an American joining the British royal family, Jellison said more people will be paying attention to the family leading up to the wedding.  ‘We seem to have a need for there to be an official ideal family that’s sort of it’s own fantasy that makes us think, Oh, that could me if I had a lot of money and a castle.” J. Umbarger, The Post

ESL Voices Lesson Plan for this post with Answer Key

Eight Royal wedding traditions that Prince Harry will follow. Photo-Daily Express

 

Excerpt: The Royal Wedding:FAQ and Answers to Everything You Ever Wanted to Know — and Some Things You Didn’t  By S. Lyall and E. Paton, The New York Times

  1. Who is getting married?

Prince Harry and Meghan Markle

Rachel Meghan Markle, a.k.a. Meghan Markle, an American actress best known for playing Rachel Zane in the long-running legal-intrigue drama “Suits,” is marrying Prince Henry Charles Albert David of Wales, a.k.a. Prince Harry.

 2. When, exactly?

Saturday, May 19, 2018. The ceremony is scheduled for noon local time (7 a.m. Eastern time) and will last about an hour. At St. George’s Chapel in Windsor Castle.

3. Is that near Buckingham Palace?

St. George’s Chapel in Windsor Castle.

Nope. Buckingham Palace is in London. Windsor Castle is in Windsor, a picturesque old town some 20 miles west of London. Windsor is also known for its proximity to Eton College, which is the private high school Harry and William attended.

4. Can I go to the wedding?

Sorry, but no, unless you’re one of 1,200 personal guests who get to sit in the chapel, or among the 2,640 additional people (including members of the royal household and “regular” people who work for charities, community organizations and the like) who have been invited to stand on the grounds of Windsor Castle to watch the wedding party enter and leave.

5. Have the invitations gone out?

Yes. On March 22, invitations went out to the first 600 guests. The ink was American, the card stock was English and the invitations were printed by Barnard and Westwood.

6. What if my invitation was lost in the mail?

Don’t fret. You can congregate around the town of Windsor with other non-invitees eager to catch a glimpse of the couple as they process through the streets in a carriage beginning at 1 p.m. local time. Windsor is not the world’s biggest town, so for prime viewing spots you might want to arrive early — like, the day before.

7. Sounds exhausting. How can I watch from home?

The wedding will be televised and live-streamed, but details have not yet been announced. We’ll keep you posted here.

8. Do we know who any of the guests will be?

While the guest list is a secret, there are a number of predictable attendees: Harry’s grandparents… his father and stepmother, William and Kate, the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge…As for nonroyals, Harry has a posse of boisterous friends — Guy Pelly, Tom Inskip and Thomas van Straubenzee, among others — who are likely to be there. Meanwhile, Meghan has her own family — her parents, who are divorced but are both expected to attend — and a number of famous friends, including Serena Williams; Priyanka Chopra…

9. What about Harry’s pal Barack Obama?

Prince Harry greets former President Barack Obama and his wife, Michelle, as they attend a dinner at Kensington Palace on April 22, 2016. Chris Jackson:Getty Images

Former President Barack Obama and his wife, Michelle, have had a special relationship with Harry since they worked with him on the Invictus Games, the sports competition for injured former service members that Harry founded several years ago…Harry has made it clear he wants the Obamas at the wedding, so it’s causing a lot of nervousness (trump could react very badly if the Obamas get to a royal wedding before he has had a chance to meet the queen.)

10. Who writes the vows?

The royal wedding vows are likely to follow a rigid script of words and rituals based on the traditional Anglican wedding ceremony prescribed in the Book of Common Prayer.

11. O.K., so tell me about Meghan Markle’s engagement ring.

Meghan’s ring

The ring was designed by Harry himself and comprises a large central diamond from Botswana and some smaller diamonds that belonged to his late mother, Diana, the Princess of Wales.

12. Who are Meghan’s parents?

Meghan Markle with her mother

Meghen Markel and her father.

Her mother, Doria Loyce Ragland is a social worker and yoga instructor who lives in California. Her father, Thomas Markle, Sr., is a lighting director who worked in California for years but now lives in Mexico. The two divorced in 1988. Mr. Markle is expected to walk his daughter down the aisle and give the traditional father-of-the-bride speech at the wedding.

13. How significant is the fact that Meghan is biracial?

Meghan is so different from most royal brides-to-be: She is American, biracial (her mother is African-American and her father is white), divorced and 36, which makes her three years older than her Harry. People of color are underrepresented in British politics and not represented at all in the royal family. Many have said they are thrilled to see someone like themselves in Meghan’s position.

14. Did Meghan have a bachelorette party?

It’s rumored that she had a spa-themed “hen do” (that’s British for “bachelorette party”) at the Soho Farmhouse, which is a countryside arm of the members-only Soho House, in March.

15. Will she have bridesmaids?

Royal weddings rarely feature bridesmaids…The palace has not commented on the subject.

16. Will Prince George and Princess Charlotte be in the wedding?

Prince George and Princess Charlotte

All the British newspapers are in a state of great excitement over the fact that 4-year-old Prince George and 2-year-old Princess Charlotte are likely to reprise their roles from their aunt Pippa’s wedding last summer as page boy and page girl. The third child, who will be less than 2 months old on the big day, is unlikely to participate.

17. What will Harry and Meghan’s titles be?

We don’t know yet. Harry is a prince but will undoubtedly get some fancy new title when he gets married. That title will automatically be bestowed on Meghan, too, just as Kate Middleton became the Duchess of Cambridge to William’s Duke. Money in Britain at the moment is on the Duke and Duchess of Sussex, a title that has not been used in the royal family since 1843.

18. Who will design Meghan Markle’s wedding dress?

That’s the million dollar (or pound) question. A royal wedding dress is one of the most prestigious commissions in British fashion and guarantees global publicity for its designer, whose identity will be kept secret until the last minute.

19. What if my invitation was lost in the mail???

(Sigh) please reread number 6!

ESL Voices Lesson Plan for this post

LESSON PLAN

NOTE: Lessons can also be used with native English speakers.

Level: Intermediate – Advanced


Language Skills: Reading, writing, and speaking. Vocabulary and grammar activities are included.


Time: Approximately 2 hours.


Materials: Student handout (from this lesson) and access to news article.


Objective: Students will read and discuss the article
with a focus on improving reading comprehension and learning new vocabulary. At the end of the lesson students will express their personal views on the topic through group work and writing.

I. Pre-Reading Activities

 Predictions: Analyzing headings and photos

Directions:  Have students  examine the titles of the post and of the actual article. After they examine the photos, ask students to create a list of  words and  ideas  that they think might be related to this article. 

II. While Reading Activities

Word Inference

Directions: Students are to infer the meanings of the words in bold taken from the article. They may use a dictionary, thesaurus, and Word Chart for assistance.

  1. Royal weddings, mimic fairytales.
  2. The members represent distant family fantasy figures.
  3. Many call this fascination escapism.
  4. Meghan Markle is known for her role in he long-running legal-intrigue  drama ‘Suits’.
  5. Windsor is also known for its proximity to Eton College.
  6. Non-invitees can congregate around the town of Windsor.
  7. Watching in person sounds exhausting.
  8. While the guest list is a secret, there are a number of predictable attendees.
  9. As for nonroyals, Harry has a posse of boisterous friends.
  10. The wedding will be a-swirl with all manner of uninformed gossip about the guests.

Word Chart By Education Oasis

 

Reading Comprehension

Fill-ins

Directions: Place students in groups and after they have read the entire article, have them complete the following sentences  taken from the article. They can use the words and terms from the list provided, or provide their own terms. They are to find the meanings of any new vocabulary.

While the ___list is a___, there are a___of predictable attendees: Harry’s___ Queen Elizabeth II and Prince Philip; his ___and stepmother, Prince Charles and Camilla, the ___of Cornwall; ___cousins, like Zara and Peter Phillips and ___Eugenie and Beatrice; and of course his ___and sister-in-law, William and Kate, the Duke and___of Cambridge.

WORD LIST:  Duchess, grandparents, various,  secret, Duchess, father,

number,  Princesses, guest,  brother,

Grammar Focus: Word -Recognition

Directions: Students choose the correct word to complete the sentences taken from the article. They are to choose from the options presented.

The wedding/wed will be a-swirl with all manners/manner of uninformed gossip/gossipy  about the guests: Who knows who, why they are sit/sitting in their particular spots…Even better, it will be a prime/premiere occasion to revisit/visit the talk about/for the intrigues, allegiances/allegiance and feuds/funds within the royal family itself.

III. Post Reading Activities

WH-How Questions

Directions: Have students use the  WH-question format to discuss or to write the main points from the article.

Who or What is the article about?

Where does the action/event take place?

When does the action/event take place?

Why did the action/event occur?

How did the action/event occur?

Discussion for Comprehension /Writing

Directions: Place students in groups and have them  discuss the following statements. Afterwards, have the groups share their thoughts as a class. To reinforce the ideas, students can write an essay on one of the topics mentioned.

  1. Do you agree that Americans are fascinated with England’s royal members?
  2. Provide examples to back your statement.
  3. In your opinion, do you think Meghan Markel will encounter problems fitting in with the royal family?  Explain why or why not.
  4. Do you think the fact that Meghan Markel is bi-racial matters? 
  5. Do you personally follow the royals?  Why or why not?
  6. Would you like to become a part of the royal family?

Role-plays

Have  each group write a short role-play about Prince Harry and Meghan Markel, or any of the royal family members.  For example, one group might want to write the vows Harry and Meghan might exchange.  Another group might think about the conversations Meghan’s relatives might have about the wedding.

1-Minute Free Writing Exercise

Directions: Allow students 1 minute to write down one new idea they’ve learned from the reading. Ask them to write down one thing they did not understand in the reading.  Review the responses as a class. Note: For the lower levels allow more time for this writing activity.

ANSWER KEY

The Trouble With Advance Directives: Doctors Often Miss Them

“This is not how it was supposed to happen…First there was a cancer diagnosis, too far gone for cure, then surgery…The elderly man had been found there earlier that evening, pale, feverish and too confused to communicate. There’s no family around. We’re probably going to have to intubate, the emergency room doctor told me… one of the doctors in training tapped me on the shoulder and pointed urgently at the computer screen. There was something important there at the very end of a progress note from the patient’s outpatient oncologist…Facing a prognosis on the order of months, the elderly man had requested that when things got worse, there would be no breathing tubes or chest compressions. Only comfort and quiet.” Dr. D. Lamas, The New York Times

ESL Voices Lesson Plan for this post with Answer Key

Image- Stuart Bradford

Excerpt: You’ve Detailed Your Last Wishes, but Doctors May Not See Them-By Daniella Lamas, M.D., The New York Times

“But now he was unable to speak for himself. Too busy with X-rays and ultrasounds and medications, the emergency team hadn’t seen the note. I sent a page off to the attending taking care of the patient to alert him to the patient’s wishes, and my resident gathered his papers to run down to the emergency room.

This patient had done everything we could have asked. He’d been brave enough to talk with his doctors about his cancer and acknowledge that time was short. He had designated a health care proxy. But there he was, surrounded by strangers, the intubation he never would have wanted looming and the record of that conversation buried in his electronic record.

Something had gone wrong. And though it would be easy to blame the oncologist for not sending the patient home with a legally binding directive documenting his end-of-life wishes, or the emergency doctors for not searching harder in the chart, it’s not that simple. As it usually is with a surgery performed on the wrong side of the patient’s body or a medication that’s prescribed despite a known allergy, the problem here is not about individuals, but instead about a system that doesn’t sufficiently protect patients from getting care they do not want.

 Increasingly, doctors like me are trained to have frank, hard conversations with our patients about prognosis and care goals. Outside the hospital, people with serious illnesses are encouraged to discuss these issues with their friends and family.

But what happens after? As a doctor working in the I.C.U., I knew firsthand the frustrations of searching the electronic record for notes and scanned documents. But I had no idea how common this problem was…Through my interviews, I heard stories of patients who had been transferred to nursing facilities without their advance directives and returned to the hospital intubated when that was explicitly not what they wanted. Others told me about patients of theirs who’d grown ill on vacation only to end up in a hospital they’d never been to, with an entirely different electronic medical record, where no one was able to access any prior documentation… In the absence of nationwide standards, there’s significant variability among hospitals and among electronic records. Some have worked to make end-of-life documentation more easily accessible.

At my hospital, for example, clicking on an ‘Advance Care Planning’ tab will bring you to a record of all advance care planning notes, health care proxy forms, scanned directives and code status orders.

This is a start, but it wasn’t enough for that elderly man in the emergency room. Habits are hard to break, and without a clear set of incentives, training and ongoing education, doctors (myself included) continue to record information about end-of-life conversations in progress notes, where they are not readily available, particularly when they are urgently needed.”

ESL Voices Lesson Plan for this post

NOTE: Lessons can also be used with native English speakers.

Level: Intermediate – Advanced


Language Skills: Reading, writing, and speaking. Vocabulary and grammar activities are included.


Time: Approximately 2 hours.


Materials: Student handout (from this lesson) and access to news article.


Objective: Students will read and discuss the article
with a focus on improving reading comprehension and learning new vocabulary. At the end of the lesson students will express their personal views on the topic through group work and writing.

I. Pre-Reading Activities

Stimulating background knowledge: Brainstorming

Directions: Place students in groups, ask students to think about what they already know about  the topic.  Next, have students look at the pictures in the text and generate ideas or words that may be connected to the article.  Regroup as a class and list these ideas on the board. Students can use a brainstorming chart for assistance.

 

Brainstorming chart by UIE

 

II. While Reading Activities

Word Inference

Directions: Students are to infer the meanings of the words in bold taken from the article. They may use a dictionary, thesaurus, and Word Chart for assistance.

  1. Many patients do not have advance directives.
  2. I was working  in the intensive care unit.
  3. The patient finally had  a discharge to go home.
  4. There was a note from the patient’s oncologist.
  5. Doctors gave him ultrasounds and medications.
  6. There was the intubation he never would have wanted looming.
  7. Increasingly, doctors are trained to have frank conversations with patients about prognosis and care goals.
  8. Some have worked to make end-of-life documentation more easily accessible.
  9. Doctors and health care workers need a clear set of incentives and training.
  10. Just imagine, your E.D. doctor is fumbling to find your information in your chart.

Word Chart By Education Oasis

 

Reading Comprehension

Sentence Match

Directions: Students  are to complete the sentences from the article by selecting the correct words or phrases.

  1. This ___ had done everything we could have asked.
  2. It’s tempting to assume that if you tell one ___ what you want at the end of your life, that’s enough.
  3. For the past year, I delved into the unexpectedly interesting world of advance ___planning.
  4. Recently, a ___ of start-ups have stepped in, trying to offer a solution.
  5. There’s software and ___patient apps that work outside the electronic record.
  6. Just imagine, your doctor is fumbling to find your ___in your chart, but you have an advance directive that was safely uploaded onto your smartphone.
  7. This most likely could have helped my ___ that day.
  8. At least, all related advance care planning documentation should be in one place in the ___.
  9. Beyond that, maybe all ___could require identification of a health care proxy for all patients.
  10. Yet as it is, we’re___.

WORDS/PHRASES: a-care, b-playing catch-up, c-clever, d-patient,  e-medical record,  f-handful,  g-information,  h-health systems,  i-patient,  j-doctor

 

Grammar Focus: Word -Recognition

Directions: Students choose the correct word to complete the sentences taken from the article. They are to choose from the options presented.

When the resident/reside arrived outside my patient’s room, he was relieved/relive to see that the elderly/elder man was still breathe/breathing on his own. The E.D. attending had held off. The patient’s family was on the way. Up in the I.C.U., we treated/trotted him gentle/gently with fluids and antibiotics and oxygen. He never did get strong/strength enough to make it back home, but I think he was quite/quiet and comfortable in the end, as he had wanted.

III. Post Reading Activities

WH-How Questions

Directions: Have students use the  WH-question format to discuss or to write the main points from the article.

Who or What is the article about?

Where does the action/event take place?

When does the action/event take place?

Why did the action/event occur?

How did the action/event occur?

Discussion for Comprehension /Writing

Directions: Place students in groups  and  have each group read the following statements from Dr. Lamas. Then see if each group can think of solutions to this problem. Share ideas as a class.

“As a doctor working in the I.C.U., I knew firsthand the frustrations of searching the electronic record for notes and scanned documents. But I had no idea how common this problem was… Through my interviews, I heard stories of patients who had been transferred to nursing facilities without their advance directives and returned to the hospital intubated when that was explicitly not what they wanted. Others told me about patients of theirs who’d grown ill on vacation only to end up in a hospital they’d never been to, with an entirely different electronic medical record, where no one was able to access any prior documentation.”

1-Minute Free Writing Exercise

Directions: Allow students 1 minute to write down one new idea they’ve learned from the reading. Ask them to write down one thing they did not understand in the reading.  Review the responses as a class. Note: For the lower levels allow more time for this writing activity.

ANSWER KEY

Category: Medical | Tags:

The History of Easter

“Easter is a Christian holiday that celebrates the belief in the resurrection of Jesus Christ from the dead. In the New Testament of the Bible, the event is said to have occurred three days after Jesus was crucified by the Romans and died in roughly 30 A.D.” The History Site

ESL Voices Lesson Plan for this post with Answer Key

British and American festivities

 

Excerpt: Easter 2018 — The History Site

The Last Supper, c.1678 (oil on canvas), Champaigne, Jean Baptiste de

“The holiday concludes the ‘Passion of Christ,’ a series of events and holidays that begins with Lent—a 40-day period of fasting, prayer and sacrifice—and ends with Holy Week, which includes Holy Thursday (the celebration of Jesus’ Last Supper with his 12 Apostles), Good Friday (on which Jesus’ death is observed), and Easter Sunday.

Although a holiday of high religious significance in the Christian faith, many traditions associated with Easter date back to pre-Christian, pagan times.

When Is Easter?

Easter 2018 occurs on Sunday, April 1. However, Easter falls on a different date each year. Easter Sunday and related celebrations, such as Ash Wednesday and Palm Sunday, are considered “moveable feasts,” although, in western Christianity, which follows the Gregorian calendar, Easter always falls on a Sunday between March 22nd and April 25th.

Religious [Meaning] of Easter:

Ron DiCianni – The Resurrection

The resurrection of Jesus, as described in the New Testament of the Bible, is essentially the foundation upon which the Christian religions are built. Hence, Easter is a very significant date on the Christian calendar.

Passover and Easter:

Passover-dreamstime.com

Notably, Easter is also associated with the Jewish holiday of Passover, as well as the exodus of the Jews from Egypt, as described in the Old Testament.

Easter Traditions:

Lent, Ash Wednesday, Palm Sunday:

Ash Wednesday & Lent 2017-

In western Christianity, including Roman Catholicism and Protestant denominations, the period prior to Easter holds special significance. This period of fasting and penitence is called Lent. It begins on Ash Wednesday, and lasts for 40 days (not including Sundays). The Sunday immediately prior to Easter is called Palm Sunday, and it commemorates Jesus’ arrival in Jerusalem, when followers laid palm leaves across the road to greet him.

Easter Eggs:

Painted Easter eggs. 4freephotos.com

Irrespective of denomination, there are many Easter-time traditions with roots that can be traced to non-Christian and even pagan or non-religious celebrations. Many non-Christians choose to observe these traditions while essentially ignoring the religious aspects of the celebration. Examples of non-religious Easter traditions include Easter eggs, and related games such as egg rolling and egg decorating. It’s believed that eggs represented fertility and birth in certain pagan traditions that pre-date Christianity.

Easter Bunny:

In some households, a character known as the Easter Bunny delivers candy and chocolate eggs to children on Easter Sunday morning. These candies often arrive in an Easter basket.

The exact origins of the Easter Bunny tradition are unknown, although some historians believe it arrived in America with German immigrants in the 1700s.

From ESL Voices:

ESL Voices Lesson Plan for this post

NOTE: Lessons can also be used with native English speakers.

Level: Intermediate – Advanced


Language Skills: Reading, writing, and speaking. Vocabulary and grammar activities are included.


Time: Approximately 2 hours.


Materials: Student handout (from this lesson) and access to news article.


Objective: Students will read and discuss the article
with a focus on improving reading comprehension and learning new vocabulary. At the end of the lesson students will express their personal views on the topic through group work and writing.

I. Pre-Reading Activities

KWL Chart

The K-W-L chart is used to activate students’ background knowledge of a topic in order to enhance their comprehension skills.

Directions: Have students use the KWL chart to list the information they already know about  the Easter holiday.  Later in the Post- Reading segment of the lesson, students can fill in what they’ve learned about the topic.

Advanced K-W-L chart.Intervention for Reading

 

II. While Reading Activities

Word Inference

Directions: Students are to infer the meanings of the words in bold taken from the article. They may use a dictionary, thesaurus, and Word Chart for assistance.

  1. Easter is a holiday of high religious significance.
  2. Traditions associated with Easter date back to pre-Christian, pagan times.
  3. Eastern Orthodox Christianity adheres to the Julian calendar.
  4. Those who believe in Jesus’ death and resurrection are given “the gift” of eternal life.
  5. In western Christianity the period prior to Easter holds special significance.
  6. Holy Week ends on Easter.
  7. Irrespective of denomination, there are many Easter-time traditions.
  8. The exact origins of the Easter Bunny tradition are unknown.
  9. Several Protestant Christian denominations, have opted to formally abandon Easter traditions, deeming them too pagan.
  10. An Easter dinner of lamb also has historical roots, since a lamb was often used as a sacrificial animal in Jewish traditions.

Color Vocabualry Map by Enchanted Learning

 

Reading Comprehension

True /False/NA-Statements

Directions: Review the following statements from the reading.  If  a statement is true they mark it T. If the statement is  not applicable, they mark it NA. If the statement is false they  mark  it F and provide the correct answer. 

  1. Easter is a Jewish holiday.
  2. Easter is also associated with the Jewish holiday of Passover.
  3. The Last Supper was essentially a Passover feast.
  4. In western Christianity the period prior to Easter holds no special significance.
  5. The Sunday immediately prior to Easter is called Palm Sunday.
  6. Palm Sunday commemorates when palm trees  were first grown.
  7. In Eastern Orthodox Christianity, Easter rituals start with the Great Lent.
  8. Examples of non-religious Easter traditions include Easter eggs, and related games such as egg rolling and egg decorating.
  9. Mostly adults  participate in Easter egg hunts.
  10. The exact origins of the Easter Bunny tradition are known.

 Grammar Focus: Prepositions

Directions: The following sentences are from the news article.  For each sentence choose the correct preposition from the choices listed. Note that not all prepositions listed are in the article.

Prepositions:  in, for, of, with, by,  on, at, to, as, into, across, around, over,  through, from, during, up, off,

___ some denominations ___Protestant Christianity, Easter Sunday marks the beginning ___ Eastertide.

Despite its significance ___ a Christian holy day, many ___ the traditions and symbols that play a key role ___ Easter observances actually have roots ___ pagan celebrations.

He was sentenced ___ death ___Pontius Pilate, the Roman prefect ___ the province of Judea ___ 26 ___ 36 A.D.

III. Post Reading Activities

 KWL Chart

Directions:  Have students  fill in the last column of the KWL chart if they used one in the pre-reading segment of this lesson.

Graphic Organizers: Finding the main idea

Directions:  Have students use this graphic organizer from Enchanted Learning  to assist them with  discussing  or writing about  the main points from the article.

Discussion for Comprehension /Writing

Directions: Place students in groups and have them  discuss the following statements. Afterwards, have the groups share their thoughts as a class. To reinforce the ideas, students can write an essay on one of the topics mentioned.

Is the Easter holiday celebrated in your country?

Are there any special traditions in your family to celebrate Easter?

From reading the article, do you think  Easter was celebrated more long ago?  Explain why or why not.

 

3-2-1-Writing

Directions: Allow students 5 minutes to write down three new ideas they’ve learned about the topic from the reading,  two things they did not understand in the reading, and one thing they would like to know that the article did not mention. Review the responses as a class.

ANSWER KEY

 

Category: Holidays | Tags:

Battling Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder and Winning

“You must really love that song,’ my mother says, and for a moment my heart stops. Both of us are plainly aware she need not be more specific than that. I attempt to read her body language out of the corner of my eye. Does she know? There’s no way, right?…What I definitely do not do is glance back and say, ‘Funny story about that song, while you’ve clearly noticed I’ve listened to it every single weeknight this entire school year, would you believe I only ever press play at exactly 8:38 p.m.?” R. Monahan, The New York Times

ESL Voices Lesson Plan for this post with Answer Key

Excerpt: How I Finally Kicked My O.C.D. by Rich Monahan, The New York Times

“And check this out, once that cable box hits 9:52 p.m., I will casually retire to my bedroom to initiate the final sequence of what has recently ballooned into a nearly 90-minute nightly routine of humiliating compulsions: I’ll touch the same four CDs laid out on my dresser in ‘order’; turn the stereo on and off; move to the entertainment center; touch the ‘Twisted Metal’ video game case; turn on the TV; boot up the PlayStation…then touch nothing else until it’s lights out at 9:58 p.m. And that’s not even the craziest part; the craziest part is that I do these things because I believe they will somehow increase my social standing among other ninth graders… and I’m pretty sure I’ve lost my mind.’

Image- Steemit

It started in seventh grade, when two childhood friends aged out of hanging out with me. Already depressed and on the verge of friendlessness, I was desperate to preserve life as it had been. Well,  my brain misfired, ‘Last time you all hung out together, you wore that one pair of Hanes tighty  whities. Put those on.’ I did. Then I wore them again the next day, and the next, for 30 days straight.

Soon, it snowballed into an impossible amount of rituals, all infused with a bizarre sense of causality: ‘If I do X, Y and Z today, then tomorrow my classmates will like me…’

OCD-UK

On the good days, obsessive-compulsive disorder can just feel like a bunch of extra chores. On the bad days, when nothing is ‘working,’ you are trapped in a living nightmare, helplessly enslaved to an oppressive and delusional belief system that has swallowed nearly every moment of your waking life.  On the bright side: I always knew exactly where my keys were. 

I tried not to examine the bigger implications of it all, though I was aware enough to know I should be absolutely ashamed. So I told no one. By the end of high school, I had friends, won superlatives and no one knew a thing about me. Mission accomplished.

But college threw an unexpected curve ball: I finally had a girlfriend. ‘Is that the same Power Bar that’s always there?’ she asks a few weeks into our relationship, staring at the twisted energy bar sitting in the cup holder of my Corolla’s center console. ‘Oh, that? No, that’d be really funny, but no, I just bought it,’ I grin… It is of course the same Power Bar I have kept in my car for months, though to be fair, only on Fridays and Saturdays when I have a show, as during the week I store it in my underwear drawer. Her brow furrows…She buys me a book about O.C.D. I never read it. When we’re among friends I’m a delight — sane and gregarious. When we’re alone, I shrink bitterly…Michelle suggests painting, I refuse. She asks for closet space, I say sorry, we cannot move Grandma’s oxygen tanks. I cannot risk any fluctuation in my recent streak of positive outcomes…Michelle dumps me a final time…I tell everyone everything. ‘So wait, what was the shaving-with-no-pants-on one about?’ my friend Nate asked.’

‘So people would like me.’ In sharing with friends and family the weirdest things about me, I expect humiliation, or at least some solid recoils in horror. Instead, they mull it over, ask a couple of questions, then tell me the weirdest things about themselves…Over time, I even become a trusted resource for friends newly tackling their own mental health… I have not had a single compulsion since.”

ESL Voices Lesson Plan for this post

NOTE: Lessons can also be used with native English speakers.

Level: Intermediate – Advanced

Language Skills: Reading, writing, and speaking. Vocabulary and grammar activities are included.


Time: Approximately 2 hours.


Materials: Student handout (from this lesson) and access to news article.


Objective: Students will read and discuss the article
with a focus on improving reading comprehension and learning new vocabulary. At the end of the lesson students will express their personal views on the topic through group work and writing.

I. Pre-Reading Activities

Directions: Have students use the KWL chart to list the information they already know about Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder (OCD).  Later in the Post- Reading segment of the lesson, students can fill in what they’ve learned about the topic.

Advanced K-W-L chart.Intervention for Reading

 

II. While Reading Activities

Word Inference

Directions: Students are to infer the meanings of the words in bold taken from the article. They may use a dictionary, thesaurus, and Word Chart for assistance.

  1. After 9:00 I will casually retire to my bedroom.
  2. I initiate the final sequence of my ritual.
  3. Having OCD can be humiliating.
  4. By was seventh grade I was already depressed.
  5. My brain seemed to have  misfired.
  6. Soon, it snowballed into an impossible amount of rituals.
  7. On the good days, obsessive-compulsive disorder can just feel like a bunch of extra chores.
  8. Some days I felt trapped in a living nightmare.
  9. I tried not to examine the bigger implications of it all.
  10. My friends simply mull it over and ask a few questions.

vocabulary Chart: Freeology

 

Reading Comprehension

Fill-ins

Directions: Place students in groups and after they have read the entire article, have them complete the following sentences  taken from the article. They can use the words and terms from the list provided, or provide their own terms. They are to find the meanings of any new vocabulary.

I spent a ___lying, secretly ___the objects in my bedroom in order to keep ___around. But opening up enough to tell them so___ us closer than ever. I have not had a single ___since.

WORD LIST: brought, compulsion, rearranging, friends, decade,

Grammar Focus: Word -Recognition

Directions: Students choose the correct word to complete the sentences taken from the article. They are to choose from the options presented.

I mastered/missed the art of deflect/deflection, expertly turning every response/repose into a joke/jokes and steering every convert/conversation into being about the other person. By the end of high school, I had friends/fiends, won superlatives and no one knew a thing about me. Mission accomplished.

III. Post Reading Activities

Discussion Questions for Comprehension /Writing

  1. According to the author what signs of OCD did he show?
  2. What are some of the reasons he gave for his behavior?
  3. How did the author finally kick his OCD?
  4. Do you know someone who has OCD? If yes describe their behavior.
  5. What would you do if you suspected someone you knew might have OCD?
  6. Look for additional information about OCD on the web (e.g., self-help books, available therapy etc.)

3-2-1-Writing

Directions: Allow students 5 minutes to write down three new ideas they’ve learned about the topic from the reading,  two things they did not understand in the reading, and one thing they would like to know that the article did not mention. Review the responses as a class.

ANSWER KEY