“How Children Read Differently From Books vs. Screens”

“Scrolling may work for social media, but experts say that for school assignments, kids learn better if they slow down their reading.” P. Klass, M.D., The New York Times, March 16, 2021

ESL Voices Lesson Plan for this post with Answer Key

Credit- Cristina Spanò, The New York Times

 

Excerpt: ByPerri Klass, M.D. The New York Times, March 16, 2021

“In this pandemic year, parents have been watching — often anxiously — their children’s increasing reliance on screens for every aspect of their education. It can feel as if there’s no turning back to the time when learning involved hitting the actual books. But the format children read in can make a difference in terms of how they absorb information.

Naomi Baron, who is professor emerita of linguistics at American University and author of a new book,“How We Read Now: Strategic Choices for Print, Screen and Audio,” said, ‘there are two components, the physical medium and the mind-set we bring to reading on that medium — and everything else sort of follows from that.’

Because we use screens for social purposes and for amusement, we all — adults and children — get used to absorbing online material, much of which was designed to be read quickly and casually, without much effort.

And then we tend to use that same approach to on-screen reading with harder material that we need to learn from, to slow down with, to absorb more carefully. A result can be that we don’t give that material the right kind of attention…Dr. Jenny Radesky, a developmental behavioral pediatrician who is an assistant professor of pediatrics at Michigan Medicine C.S. Mott Children’s Hospital in Ann Arbor, said that apps designed to teach reading in the early years of school rely on ‘gamification meant to keep children engaged.’ And though they do successfully teach core skills, she said, ‘what has been missing in remote schooling is the classroom context, the teacher as meaning maker, to tie it all together, helping it be more meaningful to you, not just a bunch of curricular components you’ve mastered.’

Any time that parents are able to engage with family reading time is good, using whatever medium works best for them, said Dr. Tiffany Munzer, also a developmental behavioral pediatrician at Mott Children’s Hospital, who has studied how young children use e-books.

However, Dr. Munzer was the lead author on a 2019 study that found that parents and toddlers spoke less overall, and also spoke less about the story when they were looking at electronic books compared with print books, and another study that showed less social back-and-forth — the toddlers were more likely to be using the screens by themselves…Dr. Radesky, who was involved in the research projects with Dr. Munzer, talked about the importance of helping children master reading that goes beyond specific remembered details — words or characters or events — so a child is ‘able to integrate knowledge gained from the story with life experience.’ And again, she said, that isn’t what is stressed in digital design. ‘Stuff that makes you think, makes you slow down and process things deeply, doesn’t sell, doesn’t get the most clicks,’ she said…Parents can help with this when their children are young, Dr. Radesky said, by discussing the story and asking the questions that help children draw those connections.”

Top 30 Free Printable Mother’s Day Coloring Pages

ESL Voices Lesson Plan for this post

NOTE: Lessons can also be used with native English speakers.

Level: Intermediate – Advanced


Language Skills: Reading, writing, and speaking. Vocabulary and grammar activities are included.


Time: Approximately 60 minutes.


Materials: Student handout (from this lesson) and access to news article.


Objective: Students will read and discuss the article with a focus on improving reading comprehension and improving oral skills. At the end of the lesson students will express their personal views on the topic through group work and writing.

I. Pre-Reading Activities

Compare/Contrast Chart

Directions: Have students list the similarities and differences between two things or ideas. Have students share their ideas with the class. The chart is from ReadWriteThink.org

II. While Reading Activities

Word Inference

Directions: Try to infer the meanings of the words in bold taken from the article. You use a dictionary, thesaurus, and Word Chart for assistance.

  1. Scrolling works for social media.
  2. The format children read in can make a difference in terms of how they absorb information.
  3. We use screens mainly for social purposes and for amusement.
  4. Many educators believe fervently in the value of reading print books to young children.
  5. Many apps and e-books have too many distractions.
  6. Reading apps are just a bunch of curricular components children have mastered.
  7. Apps have all these visually salient features which distracts from the core content.
  8. It should be the job of the software developers to design electronic books that encourage language and interactions.
  9. When kids enter digital spaces, they have access to an infinite number of platforms and websites.
  10. Professor Baron said that in an ideal world, children would learn how to read contiguous text for enjoyment.

Vocabulary Cluster By Learnnc.org

 

Grammar Focus: Word -Recognition

Directions: Students choose the correct word to complete the sentences taken from the article. They are to choose from the options presented.

In/On elementary school their/there’s an/and opportunity to/too start a/an conversation about the advantage/advantages of the different media: It goes/go for print, gone/goes for an/a digital screen, goes for audio, goes for video, they all have/had their/there uses — we need two/to make kids aware/awareness that knot/not all media are best suited to/too all purposes.

Identify The  Speakers

Directions: Read the following quotes from the speakers in the article. Then identify the speakers.

  1. “there are two components, the physical medium and the mind-set we bring to reading on that medium — and everything else sort of follows from that.”
  2. “…apps designed to teach reading in the early years of school rely on gamification meant to keep children engaged.”
  3. “What has been missing in remote schooling is the classroom context, the teacher as meaning maker, to tie it all together, helping it be more meaningful to you, not just a bunch of curricular components you’ve mastered.”
  4. “In an ideal world, children would learn “how to read contiguous text for enjoyment, how to stop, how to reflect.”
  5. “Any time that parents are able to engage with family reading time is good, using whatever medium works best for them.”
  6. “With younger children it makes sense to stick with print to the extent that it is possible.”

III. Post Reading Activities

WH-How Questions

Directions: Have students use the  WH-question format to discuss or to write the main points from the article.

Who or What is the article about?

Where does the action/event take place?

When does the action/event take place?

Why did the action/event occur?

How did the action/event occur?

Discussion Questions for Comprehension /Writing

Directions: Have  students discuss the following questions/statements. Afterwards,  students share their thoughts as a class. To reinforce the ideas, students can write an essay on one of the topics mentioned.

  1. Do you  prefer reading online or reading actual books? Why?
  2. In your opinion, which is better for young children, reading books or reading online? Why?
  3. According to the article what are the two main purposes for online reading?
  4. Why are print books better for parents and children?
  5. What is  dialogic reading?
  6. What is missing in online schooling for children?
  7. According to a 2019 study, what happens when parents and children read electronic books compared to reading print books?
  8. According to Dr. Radesky why is metacognition important for children to develop?
  9. After reading this article write down three new ideas you have learned about this  topic from the reading,  two things that you did not understand in the reading, and one thing that you would like to know that the article did not mention.

ANSWER KEY

Tips On Returning to the Job Market in 2021

“Many job seekers don’t know where to look after the year we’ve just had. If you count yourself among this crowd, here’s how to get back into the market, even if you’re feeling rusty.” C.Cowles, The New York Times, April 24, 2021

ESL Voices Lesson Plan for this post with Answer Key

Excerpt: How to Get Back Into the Job Market, By Charlotte Cowles, The New York Times,April 24, 2021

“Airlines are canceling flights because they don’t have enough pilots to fly them. Restaurants are posting open positions on their Instagram feeds. Even the local grocery store has a “hiring” sign out front. Welcome to spring 2021: After a year of being battered by the pandemic, the economy is finally showing signs of a strong, steady recovery, and jobs are popping up like crocuses. Employers added almost a million positions in March alone, according to the Labor Department… But with this hiring frenzy comes a new conundrum: How can the still-staggering number of unemployed Americans (about 9.7 million, per the latest report from the Bureau of Labor Statistics, or more if you’re counting those who are underemployed) find their way to the right positions?

If you count yourself among this crowd, here’s how to bridge the disconnect and get back into the job market, even if you’re feeling rusty…Brush upon your digital communication skills. If you haven’t spent the past year in Zoom meetings, you didn’t exactly miss out, but you still need to be able to present yourself as savvy and professional onscreen…Look online — and not just on LinkedIn. LinkedIn is by far the biggest job-searching tool, and you’ll want to make sure your profile is up-to-date and well tended… Talk to an employment agency, recruiter, or headhunter. Many job seekers think that they have to pay recruiters to find them jobs. But it’s actually the opposite — employers hire recruiters to find qualified candidates…Broaden your horizons. The transition to, and acceptance of, remote work has enabled employers to cast a wider net when they search for talent — and so should you, in looking for jobs.”

Related Article: “Boston employers are embarking on a grand experiment, by shifting their offices to a hybrid model. As they plan to bring workers back to the office starting this summer, white-collar employers in the Boston area are entering a world in which remote work becomes more the norm than the exception.” By Jon Chesto, The Boston Globe

Key Things to Know About COVID-19 Vaccines CDC (Centers for Disease Control) 

 

ESL Voices Lesson Plan for this post

NOTE: Lessons can also be used with native English speakers.

Level: Intermediate – Advanced


Language Skills: Reading, writing, and speaking. Vocabulary and grammar activities are included.


Time: Approximately 60 minutes.


Materials: Student handout (from this lesson) and access to news article.


Objective: Students will read and discuss the article
with a focus on improving reading comprehension and improving oral skills. At the end of the lesson students will express their personal views on the topic through group work and writing.

I. Pre-Reading Activities

KWL Chart

Directions: Have students use the KWL chart to list the information they already know about  ‘Finding jobs in 2021.’  Later in the Post- Reading segment of the lesson, students can fill in what they’ve learned about the topic.

Advanced K-W-L chart.Intervention for Reading

 

II. While Reading Activities

Word Inference

Directions: Try to infer the meanings of the words in bold taken from the article. You use a dictionary, thesaurus, and Word Chart for assistance.

  1. After a year of being battered by the pandemic, the economy is finally showing signs of recovery.
  2. Jobs are popping up like crocuses.
  3. Across our industry, everyone is prioritizing hiring.
  4. Taco Bell helped by converting parking lots into drive-through job fairs last week.
  5. To find 5,000 new employees in one day is definitely unprecedented.
  6. There are more jobs than there are available candidates.
  7. With this hiring frenzy comes a new conundrum.
  8. You need to brush up on your digital communication skills.
  9. Interested people should talk to an employment agency, recruiter, or headhunter.
  10. It is important for you to broaden  your horizons when looking for work.

 

 Grammar Focus: Structure and Usage

Directions: The following groups of sentences are from the article. One of the sentences in each group contains a grammatical  error.  Identify the sentence (1, 2, or 3 ) from each group that contains the grammatical error.

I

  1. Airlines are canceling flight because they don’t have enough pilots to fly them.
  2. Restaurants are posting open positions on their Instagram feeds.
  3. Even the local grocery store has a “hiring” sign out front.

II

  1. Across the industry, everyone are prioritizing hiring.
  2. It’s frustrating when candidates have been looking for work and can’t find it.
  3. The main problem is that many job seekers don’t know where to look.

 

III

  1. If you’re looking by work, it can be helpful to share that with your own online network.
  2. A friend or connection might be able to refer you to a job opening.
  3. This could also be a good time to make a career transition.

Identify The  Speakers

Directions: Read the following quotes from the speakers in the article. Then identify the speakers.

  1. “We’re constantly looking for new ways to market our jobs.”
  2. Across our industry, everyone is prioritizing hiring.”
  3. “People who’ve been out of the work force should practice setting up Zooms with their friends or family, so that they feel comfortable on video.”
  4. “The market for job candidates in the technology space is crazy right now.”
  5. “It takes practice to be able to shake off nerves when you’re going through the process.”
  6. “It’s frustrating when we hear job candidates say they’ve been looking for work and can’t find it.”
  7. “And no matter what field you’re in, there’s probably a recruiter who’s looking to staff it right now.”
  8. III. Post Reading Activities

WH-How Questions

Directions: Have students use the  WH-question format to discuss or to write the main points from the article.

Who or What is the article about?

Where does the action/event take place?

When does the action/event take place?

Why did the action/event occur?

How did the action/event occur?

Discussion Questions for Comprehension /Writing

Directions: Have  students discuss the following questions/statements. Afterwards,  students share their thoughts as a class. To reinforce the ideas, students can write an essay on one of the topics mentioned.

  1. According to the article what is the main problem people are having finding work in 2021?
  2. Why should people searching for jobs practice their digital communication skills?
  3. Give examples of social platforms.
  4. What is the purpose of LinkedIn?
  5. Why is it important to talk to your former employers from the past five years?
  6. Explain the difference between contract work and long-term work.
  7. Write down three new ideas  that you’ve learned about the topic from the reading,  two things that you did not understand in the reading, and one thing you would like to know that the article did not mention.

ANSWER KEY

Category: Education | Tags:

Improving Our Wildlife Will Improve Our Lives

“Sweden’s announcement that it is to build a series of animal bridges is the latest in global efforts to help wildlife navigate busy roads.” The Guardian, Jan. 23, 2021

Reindeer viaducts in Sweden will keep herds safe from traffic as they roam in search of grazing. Photograph- Pawel Garski.:Alamy

 

ESL Voices Lesson Plan for this post with Answer Key

Excerpt: How creating wildlife crossings can help reindeer, bears – and even crabs, The Guardian, Jan. 2021

“Every April, Sweden’s main highway comes to a periodic standstill. Hundreds of reindeer overseen by indigenous Sami herders shuffle across the asphalt on the E4 as they begin their journey west to the mountains after a winter gorging on the lichen near the city of Umeå.

Red crabs on Christmas Island climb a bridge designed for their protection. Photograph- Chris Bray Photography:Swell Lodg

As Sweden’s main arterial road has become busier, the crossings have become increasingly fractious, especially if authorities do not arrive in time to close the road. Sometimes drivers try to overtake the reindeer as they cross – spooking the animals and causing long traffic jams as their Sami owners battle to regain control.

‘During difficult climate conditions, these lichen lands can be extra important for the reindeer,’ says Per Sandström, a landscape ecologist at the Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences who works as an intermediary between the Sami and authorities to improve the crossings.

A wildlife overpass in Banff national park, in the Canadian Rockies. Photograph- Ross MacDonald:Banff National Park

This week, Swedish authorities announced they would build up to a dozen “renoducts” (reindeer viaducts) to aid the crossings and allow reindeer herds to reach grazing more easily…The country’s 4,500 Sami herders and 250,000 reindeer have been hit hard by the climate crisis, battling forest fires in the summer and freezing rain in the winter that hides lichen below impenetrable sheets of ice…The renoducts are part of a growing number of wildlife bridges and underpasses around the world that aim to connect fractured habitats. On the Yucatán peninsula in Mexico, underpasses have been used to shield jaguars from traffic.

Mountain lions live in the Santa Monica Mountains.

Natural canopy bridges in the Peruvian Amazon have helped porcupines, monkeys and kinkajous pass over natural gas pipelines…To help save the mountain lion population from local extinction, an $87m (£63m) wildlife bridge is planned over the 101 highway north of LA, which would be the largest in the world… A 2014 study found that fencing off the road and installing wildlife passes had maintained high genetic diversity in black and grizzly bear populations…a big fall in roadkill along the highway, also significantly reducing human mortality from animal collision.”

Key Things to Know About COVID-19 Vaccines CDC (Centers for Disease Control)

 

ESL Voices Lesson Plan for this post

NOTE: Lessons can also be used with native English speakers.

Level: Intermediate – Advanced


Language Skills: Reading, writing, and speaking. Vocabulary and grammar activities are included.


Time: Approximately 60 minutes.


Materials: Student handout (from this lesson) and access to news article.


Objective: Students will read and discuss the article
with a focus on improving reading comprehension and improving oral skills. At the end of the lesson students will express their personal views on the topic through group work and writing.

Pre-reading

 Predictions: Using a Pre-reading Organizer

Directions: Examine the title of the post and of the actual article. Next examine  any photos. Write a paragraph describing what you think this article will discuss. A pre-reading organizer may be used.

Pre-reading Organizer By Scholastic

 

II. While Reading Activities

Word Inference

Directions: Try to infer the meanings of the words in bold taken from the article. You use a dictionary, thesaurus, and Word Chart for assistance.

  1. Every year hundreds of reindeer shuffle across the asphalt in Sweden.
  2. The reindeer are overseen by indigenous Sami herders.
  3. They begin their journey west to the mountains after a winter gorging on the lichen near the city of Umeå.
  4. Per Sandström is a landscape ecologist at the Swedish University of Agricultural.
  5. Sometimes drivers try to overtake the reindeer as they cross.
  6. During difficult climate conditions, these lichen lands can be extra important for the reindeer.
  7. Swedish authorities announced they would build up to a dozen “renoducts” (reindeer viaducts) to aid the crossings.
  8. It is hoped the crossings will allow herders to find fresh grazing lands and alleviate traffic jams.
  9. Natural canopy bridges in the Peruvian Amazon have helped porcupines and monkeys.
  10. The wildlife bridges help avert some of the billions of animal deaths that happen on the roads every year.

 

Grammar Focus: Identifying Prepositions

Directions: The following sentences are from the news article.For each sentence choose the correct preposition from the choices listed. Note that not all prepositions listed are in the article.

Some Prepositions: at,as, across, around,by, during,for, from, in, into,of, on,to, over,off, through, up,with, since,

It is hoped the crossings will allow herders___find fresh grazing lands and alleviate traffic jams, and also help moose and lynx ___move around the landscape. The country’s 4,500 Sami herders and 250,000 reindeer have been hit hard___the climate crisis, battling forest fires___the summer and freezing rain ___the winter that hides lichen ___impenetrable sheets ___ice… ___southern California, there have been signs ___inbreeding ___lions___ the Santa Monica Mountains because busy freeways around Los Angeles have isolated populations___ low genetic diversity.

 

Reading Comprehension: Identify The  Speakers

Directions: Read the following quotes from the speakers in the article. Then identify the speakers.

  1. “During difficult climate conditions, these lichen lands can be extra important for the reindeer.”
  2. “When habitat is isolated, we can have impact on individual animals where they might not be able to find water or food. We can also have impact on the genetic diversity of populations.”
  3. “We’re woefully behind the rest of the world. In Europe, it’s become second nature in some areas.”

III. Post Reading Activities

Graphic Organizers: Finding The Main Idea

Directions:  Have students use this advanced organizer from Write Design to assist them with  discussing  or writing about  the main idea and points from the article.

Discussion Questions for Comprehension /Writing

Directions: Have  students discuss the following questions/statements. Afterwards,  students share their thoughts as a class. To reinforce the ideas, students can write an essay on one of the topics mentioned.

  1. Can you think of ways that climate change has affected our wild life in the U.S.?
  2. Why do the Sami herders have to take their reindeer across Sweden’s highway every April?
  3. What are renoducts and what purpose do they serve?
  4. What are some of the climate problems Sami herders have encountered?
  5. According to the article, which animals benefit from these crossings the most?
  6. What other countries have provided protection for their animals from heavy vehicle traffic?
  7. According to the article, approximately how many animal deaths occur on the roads every year world wide?
  8. Why has there been inbreeding among the lion population in the Santa Monica Mountains?
  9. How are humans protected by the animal bridges?
  10. Do you agree or disagree that more animal bridges should be built? Provide a reason for your answer.
  11. What new information have you learned from this article?

3-2-1-Writing

Directions: Allow students 5 minutes to write down three new ideas they’ve learned about the topic from the reading, two things they did not understand in the reading, and one thing they would like to know that the article did not mention. Review the responses as a class.

ANSWER KEY

Documentary “Reappraising Ernest Hemingway” Questions the Author’s Machismo

“Filmmaker Lynn Novick has joined Ken Burns to make a new six-hour documentary about  Ernest Hemingway for PBS. “Those of you who know Hemingway, or think you know Hemingway, will get a new aspect to it. Those of you who don’t, buckle your seatbelt!” K. Burns April 11, 2021

ESL Voices Lesson Plan for this post with Answer Key

Ernest Hemingway (July 21, 1899 – July 2, 1961) poster by Alfred Eisenstaedt.

Note: Unless stated, all photos are from the book, Hemingway: A Life in Pictures By Boris Veidovsky (author) and Mariel Hemingway (author) October 27, 2011

Excerpt: Reappraising Ernest Hemingway, CBS News, April 11, 2021

“Filmmaker Lynn Novick, like a lot of us, first read Hemingway when she was in high school: “I was a little intimidated to pick up a book by Ernest Hemingway,” she said… Four decades later, Novick has joined Ken Burns to make a new six-hour documentary about Hemingway for PBS… We all know the Hemingway image, the very definition of macho: war correspondent, deep-sea fisherman, bullfighting aficionado, big-game hunter. Correspondent Mark Whitaker asked Novick, ‘Hemingway is so much the poster boy for toxic masculinity and misogyny and a little bit of racism kind of thrown in there, too.’

Ernest, [young] hunter in the grass, 1906

‘Yeah, well, you know, his public image is really a problem in a lot of ways, for this moment,’ she said. ‘I think a lot of us will look at a man who seems to be glorifying bullfighting and killing animals for sport, and being dominant in physical conquest, and having women be subservient to you. His public persona is challenging at best, and problematic.’

In Teruel, December 1937, by Robert Capa. Ernest was becoming a recognizable face of the war.

He could be the life of the party, but also treacherous, to his friends…’That really, at times, characterizes Ernest Hemingway in all sorts of ways – he could be a real bitch!’ Burns said. The documentary examines Hemingway’s relationships with women, in real life and in the pages of his writing…He wants all of his four wives to cut their hair short, like boys. He wants to grow his long. He wants to change things up.’

Ernest Hemingway at his standing writing desk… near Malaga  (Photo by Loomis Dean:Getty Images)

In life, and in novels like The Garden of Eden (which was published after he died), Hemingway seemed to have a fascination with androgyny and sexual role reversals…Whitaker asked, ‘So ultimately, what are you trying to say? Like, does Papa Hemingway secretly want to be a Mama Hemingway?”I don’t think we really know that’ [replied Novick]…Hemingway led a vibrant life of worldwide fame and soaring literary success.

Ernest Hemingway standing with shot-gun indoors circa 1950s. (Photo by Foto search: Getty Images). Image provided by Getty Images.

But he was also haunted – by alcoholism, a family history of mental illness, and, as the new documentary lays out, a series of concussions suffered during war, accidents and plane crashes. It was a complicated life, and Ernest Hemingway died, by suicide, at the age of 61.”

 

ESL- Voices Lesson Plans: Four of Ernest Hemingway’s Classic stories:

 

Story: Indian Camp By Ernest Hemingway

Lesson Plan: Indian Camp

Answer Key

Story:  The Doctor and the Doctor’s Wife  By Ernest Hemingway

Lesson Plan: The Doctor and the Doctor’s Wife

Answer Key

Story: Soldier’s Home   By Ernest Hemingway

Lesson Plan: Soldier’s Home

Answer Key

Story: Cat in The Rain  By Ernest Hemingway

Lesson Plan: Cat In The Rain 

Answer Key

Key Things to Know About COVID-19 Vaccines CDC

(Centers for Disease Control)

ESL Voices Lesson Plan for this post

NOTE: Lessons can also be used with native English speakers.

Level: Intermediate – Advanced


Language Skills: Reading, writing, and speaking. Vocabulary and grammar activities are included.


Time: Approximately 60 minutes.


Materials: Student handout (from this lesson) and access to news article.


Objective: Students will read and discuss the article
with a focus on improving reading comprehension and improving oral skills. At the end of the lesson students will express their personal views on the topic through group work and writing.

I. Pre-Reading Activities

Stimulating background knowledge: Brainstorming

Directions: Place students in groups, ask students to think about what they already know about the author Ernest Hemingway.  Next, have students look at the pictures in the text and generate ideas or words that may be connected to the article.  Regroup as a class to list and discuss these ideas. Students can use a brainstorming chart for assistance.

II. While Reading Activities

Word Inference

Directions: Try to infer the meanings of the words in bold taken from the article. You use a dictionary, thesaurus, and Word Chart for assistance.

  1. The headlines are filled these days with stories of so-called cancel culture, as history is reappraised.
  2. Hemingway was known for his display of confidence and overall tough guy machismo.
  3. Filmmaker Lynn Novick was a little intimidated to pick up a book by Ernest Hemingway.
  4. She was mesmerized by the writing and the characters and the world.
  5. Four decades later, Novick has joined Ken Burns to make  a documentary about Hemingway.
  6. He is described as  the seminal writer in the 20th century for Americans.
  7. Hemingway is so much the poster boy for toxic masculinity and misogyny.
  8. His public persona is challenging at best, and problematic.
  9. He could be the life of the party, but also treacherous, to his friends.
  10. But he was also haunted – by alcoholism, and a family history of mental illness.

 

Grammar Focus: Structure and Usage

Directions: The following groups of sentences are from the article. One of the sentences in each group contains a grammatical  error.  Identify the sentence (1, 2, or 3 ) from each group that contains the grammatical error.

I

  1. Lynn Novick have joined Ken Burns to make a new documentary about Hemingway.
  2. It follows their films on other not-so-small topics.
  3. Hemingway is the poster boy for toxic masculinity.

II

  1. His public image is really an problem in a lot of ways.
  2. He could be the life of the party, but also treacherous, to his friends.
  3. His third wife, Martha Gelhorn was also  a war correspondent.

III

  1. He is around because he means something as an artist.
  2. He really suffered a lot emotionally.
  3. Hemingway wanted his wife to be completely obedient.

 

Reading Comprehension Fill-ins

Directions: Place students in groups and after they have read the entire article, have them complete the following sentences  taken from the article. They can use the words and terms from the list provided, or provide their own terms. They are to find the meanings of any new vocabulary.

“We ___in an ___where a lot of ___figures of the past – most of them ___men – some ___are being taken down, their ___are being taken off of___. Writers are being taken out of curriculums. Why hasn’t ___been canceled? And why shouldn’t he be canceled?”

WORD LIST: Hemingway, powerful, live, statues, names, era, buildings, White,

III. Post Reading Activities

Discussion Questions for Comprehension /Writing

Directions: Have  students discuss the following questions/statements. Afterwards,  students share their thoughts as a class. To reinforce the ideas, students can write an essay on one of the topics mentioned.

  1. Have you read any stories by Ernest Hemingway? If so which ones?
  2. What do you know about Ernest Hemingway’s personal life?
  3. Why did Ken Burns describe Hemingway as the seminal writer in the 20th century for Americans?
  4. What does the phrase “cancel culture” mean?
  5. According to professor Marc Dudley why hasn’t Hemingway been canceled?
  6. In your opinion, should  Hemingway  be canceled?
  7. What personal problems did Hemingway suffer?
  8. How did Hemingway die?
  9. Write down three new ideas you’ve learned about the topic from this reading,  two things  that you did not understand in the reading, and one thing you would like to know that the article did not mention. Review the responses as a class.

Additional Activities:

Using Pictures to tell a story

Directions: Place students in groups and have them view the various photos of Hemingway.  Each group writes a description paragraph or two explaining what they think the photos mean. Share the stories as a class.

Asking Questions

Directions: Place students in groups. Have each group list 3  questions they would like to ask Hemingway or any person mentioned in the article. Groups share questions as a class.

ANSWER KEY

Recognizing Depression in Young Kids

“We tend to think of childhood as a time of innocence and joy, but as many as 2 to 3 percent of children from ages 6 to 12 can have serious depression.” P. Klass, M.D., The New York Times, April 1, 2021

ESL Voices Lesson Plan for this post with Answer Key

Credit- Mikyung Lee, The New York Times

Excerpt:How to Spot Depression in Young Children, Perri Klass, M.D., The New York Times, April 1, 2021

“When parents bring their children in for medical care these days, there is no such thing as a casual, ‘Hey, how’s it going?’ We doctors walk into every exam room prepared to hear a story of sadness and stress, or at the very least, of coping and keeping it together in this very hard year, full of isolation, loss, tragedy and hardship, with routines disrupted and comfort hard to come by.

Parents have carried heavy burdens of stress and responsibility, worrying about themselves but also watching their children struggle, and there is worldwide concern about depression and suicidality among young people.

But it isn’t only the adults and the young adults and teenagers who are suffering and sad; young children can also experience depression, but it can look very different, which makes it challenging for parents — or doctors — to recognize it and provide help.

Rachel Busman, a clinical psychologist at the Child Mind Institute in New York City, said that it can be hard to think about depression in younger children because we picture childhood as a time of innocence and joy.

But as many as 2 to 3 percent of children ages 6 to 12 can have serious depression, she said. And children with anxiety disorders, which are present in more than 7 percent of children aged 3 to 17, are also at risk for depression. Depression was originally conceived of as an adult problem. Maria Kovacs, professor of psychiatry at the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, said that in the 1950s and ’60s, there were child psychiatrists who believed that children did not have sufficient ego development to feel depression… What does depression look like in younger children?

When young children are depressed, Dr. Kovacs said, it’s not unusual for ‘the primary mood to be irritability, not sadness — it comes across as being very cranky.’

And while suicide attempts by elementary school-aged children are rare, they do happen and have increased in recent years. Suicide was the second leading cause of death in children 10 to 14 in 2018…If a child talks about wanting to die, ask what that child means, and get help from a therapist if you’re concerned.”

Key Things to Know About COVID-19 Vaccines CDC

(Centers for Disease Control)

ESL Voices Lesson Plan for this post

NOTE: Lessons can also be used with native English speakers.

Level: Intermediate – Advanced


Language Skills: Reading, writing, and speaking. Vocabulary and grammar activities are included.


Time: Approximately 60 minutes.


Materials: Student handout (from this lesson) and access to news article.


Objective: Students will read and discuss the article
with a focus on improving reading comprehension and improving oral skills. At the end of the lesson students will express their personal views on the topic through group work and writing.

I. Pre-Reading Activities

Directions: Examine the titles of the post and of the actual article.  Examine any photos, then create a list of  words and  ideas  that you  and your group members think might be related to this article. Discuss these ideas as a class.

Pre-reading organizer by San Juan Edu.

 

II. While Reading Activities

Word Inference

Directions: Try to infer the meanings of the words in bold taken from the article. You use a dictionary, thesaurus, and Word Chart for assistance.

  1. We doctors walk into every exam room prepared to hear a story of sadness and stress.
  2. Coping this year is very hard because of  isolation, loss and tragedy.
  3. Parents worry about their children’s struggle with depression and suicidal thoughts. 
  4. More young children are suffering from depression.
  5. There are also children with anxiety disorders.
  6. Before adolescence, depression is equally common in girls and boys.
  7. The primary mood  is irritability, not sadness — it comes across as being very cranky.
  8. Parents should look for significant changes in functioning.
  9. This might mean a child loses interest in the toys or games or jokes or rituals that used to be reliably fun.
  10. A preschool-aged child might be depressed if they are having daily tantrums.

Grammar Focus: Identifying Prepositions

Directions: The following sentences are from the news article.  For each sentence identify the prepositions.

We tend to think of childhood as a time of innocence and joy.

When parents bring their children in for medical care these days, there is no such thing as a casual, “Hey, how’s it going?”

We doctors walk into every exam room prepared to hear a story of sadness.

It can be hard to think about depression in younger children because we picture childhood as a time of innocence and joy.

What does depression look like in younger children?

The best way for parents to recognize depression in young children is not so much by what a child says as by what the child does — or stops doing.

Identify The  Speakers

Directions: Read the following quotes from the speakers in the article. Then identify the speakers.

  1. “…it can be hard to think about depression in younger children because we picture childhood as a time of innocence and joy.”
  2. “…according to epidemiologic research, between 1 and 2 percent of young children — as young as 3 — are depressed.”
  3. “… in the 1950s and ’60s, there were child psychiatrists who believed that children did not have sufficient ego development to feel depression.”
  4. “In serious forms it snowballs with time, and earlier onset is associated with worse outcomes across the life span.”

III. Post Reading Activities

WH-How Questions

Directions: Have students use the  WH-question format to discuss or to write the main points from the article.

Who or What is the article about?

Where does the action/event take place?

When does the action/event take place?

Why did the action/event occur?

How did the action/event occur?

Discussion Questions for Comprehension /Writing

Directions: Have  students discuss the following questions/statements. Afterwards,  students share their thoughts as a class. To reinforce the ideas, students can write an essay on one of the topics mentioned.

  1. Do you feel that young children can suffer from depression? Why?
  2. When doctors speak with parents what are they prepared to hear?
  3. According to Ms. Busman, why is it hard to think about depression in young children?
  4. What percent of children ages 6-12 have serious depression?
  5. Originally, which group of people were conceived as the only ones having depression?
  6. During the 1950s and 60s what did psychiatrists believe about children and depression?
  7. What are some of the signs of depression in younger children?
  8. The article states, “while suicide attempts by elementary school-aged children are rare, they do happen and have increased in recent years. Suicide was the second leading cause of death in children 10 to 14 in 2018…” In your opinion, why have suicide rates increase among young children?
  9. What does PCIT stand for, and how does it help children with depression?
  10. According to Dr. Busman, what should one do if a child talks about wanting to die?

3-2-1-Writing

Directions: Allow students 5 minutes to write down three new ideas they’ve learned about the topic from the reading, two things they did not understand in the reading, and one thing they would like to know that the article did not mention. Review the responses as a class.

ANSWER KEY