Category Archives: Literature

Is 2017 a Mirror Image of Orwell’s 1984?

“The dystopia [Oceania] described in George Orwell’s nearly 70-year-old novel 1984 suddenly feels all too familiar. A world in which Big Brother (or maybe the National Security Agency) is always listening in, and high-tech devices can eavesdrop in people’s homes… A world  where fear and hate are drummed up against foreigners…where the government insists on defining its own reality and where propaganda permeates the lives of people too distracted by rubbishy tabloids.” M. Kakutani, The New York Times

ESL Voices Lesson Plan for this post with Answer Key

Excerpt:  Why ‘1984’ Is a 2017 Must-Read, By Michiko  Kakutani, The New York Times

1984  shot to No. 1 on Amazon’s best-seller list this week, after Kellyanne Conway, an adviser to Trump described demonstrable falsehoods told by the White House press secretary Sean Spicer — regarding the size of inaugural crowds — as  ‘alternative facts.’

It was a phrase chillingly reminiscent, for many readers, of the Ministry of Truth’s efforts in 1984 at ‘reality control.’ To Big Brother and the Party, Orwell wrote, ‘the very existence of external reality was tacitly denied by their philosophy. The heresy of heresies was common sense.’  Regardless of the facts, ‘Big Brother is omnipotent’ and  ‘the Party is infallible.’

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As the novel’s hero, Winston Smith, sees it, ‘The Party told you to reject the evidence of your eyes and ears. It was their final, most essential command.’ (George Orwell 1984 chapter 7-Part One)

Freedom, he [Winston] reminds himself, ‘is the freedom to say that two plus two make four,’ even though the Party will force him to agree that ‘TWO AND TWO MAKE FIVE’ — not unlike the way Mr. Spicer tried to insist that Mr. Trump’s inauguration crowd was ‘the largest audience to ever witness an inauguration,’ despite data and photographs to the contrary.

Not surprisingly, 1984 has found a nervous readership in today’s post-truth era. It’s an era in which misinformation and fake news have proliferated on the web; Russia is flooding the West with propaganda to affect elections and sow doubts about the democratic process; poisonous tensions among ethnic and religious groups are fanned by right-wing demagogues; and reporters scramble to sort out a cascade of lies and falsehoods told by Trump and his aides — from false accusations that journalists had invented a rift between him and the intelligence community (when he had compared the intelligence agencies to Nazis) to debunked claims that millions of unauthorized immigrants robbed him of a popular-vote majority…In this world, 2 + 2 does = 5, as Orwell noted, and the acceptance of bad arithmetic simply becomes a testament to the power of rulers to define reality and the terms of debate.”

Related Article: Steve Bannon Calls Press the ‘Opposition Party,’ Which Should ‘Keep Its Mouth Shut’– By Adam K. Raymond, New York Magazine

ESL Voices Lesson Plan for this post

NOTE: Lessons can also be used with native English speakers.

Level: Intermediate – Advanced


Language Skills: Reading, writing, and speaking. Vocabulary and grammar activities are included.


Time: Approximately 2 hours.


Materials: Student handout (from this lesson) and access to news article.


Objective: Students will read and discuss the article
with a focus on improving reading comprehension and learning new vocabulary. At the end of the lesson students will express their personal views on the topic through group work and writing.

I. Pre-Reading Activities

 Predictions: Using a Pre-reading Organizer

Directions:  Ask students to examine the title of the post and of the actual article they are about to read. Then, have them  examine the photos. Ask students to write a paragraph describing what they think this article will discuss. Students can use a Pre-reading organizer for assistance.

II. While Reading Activities

Word Inference

Directions: Students are to infer the meanings of the words in bold taken from the article. They may use a dictionary, thesaurus, and Word Chart for assistance.

  1. In the novel 1984 Orwell describes Oceania as a dystopia.
  2. Demonstrable falsehoods were told by the White House.
  3. Propaganda permeates the lives of people.
  4. Religious groups are fanned by right-wing demagogues.
  5. Orwell presciently argued that people needed to be vigilant.
  6. There are several government agencies are involved in environmental issues.
  7. Of course, all of these developments are being constantly updated.
  8. This mixture of gullibility and cynicism are dangerous.
  9. Some people do not particularly object to being deceived.
  10. This aspect of government is a despairing vision.

Word Map by Against the Odds

 

Reading Comprehension: Fill-ins

Directions: Place students in groups and after they have read the entire article, have them complete the following paragraphs taken from the article. They can use the words and terms from the list provided, or provide their own terms. They are to find the meanings of any new vocabulary.

Orwell had been ___about the___that would become 1984 as early as 1944, when he wrote a letter about ___and Hitler, and the___of emotional ___and a tendency to ___in the existence of objective___ because all the ___have to fit in with the words and___of some infallible führer.”

WORD LIST: horrors, truth,  nationalism, thinking, prophecies,  novel, disbelieve, Stalin, facts,

Grammar: Word -Recognition

Directions: Students choose the correct word to complete the sentences taken from the article. They are to choose from the options presented.

Of course, all of these developments/developers are beginning/being constantly updated, with regular/regularly flurries/flowers of news and deny/denials and counter-denials — a confusing steak/state of affairs that itself would not have surprised/suppressed Orwell, since he new/knew the value of such confusion to those in powerful/power.

III. Post Reading Activities

Questions for Comprehension /Writing

Directions: Place students in groups and have them  discuss the following statements. Afterwards, have the groups share their thoughts as a class. To reinforce the ideas, students can write an essay on one of the following  topics.

  1. Create a list of freedoms that you currently enjoy in your home,  in your neighbor,  school and in this country (USA).
  2. Is there a  possibility of these freedoms ever being denied? Discuss why or why not.
  3. The U.S. Constitution and the Bill of Rights grant freedoms to all American citizens. Make a list of these rights. In your opinion is the current government upholding these rights? Discuss why or why not.

3-2-1-Writing Activity

Directions: Allow students 5 minutes to write down three new ideas they’ve learned about the topic from the reading,  two things they did not understand in the reading, and one thing they would like to know that the article did not mention. Review the responses as a class.

ANSWER KEY

Pride and Prejudice: A 2016 Makeover?

“It takes confidence — some might even say hubris — to rewrite one of the most beloved novels in the English canon. So Curtis Sittenfeld was prepared for a backlash when word got out that she was writing a modern-day version of Jane Austen’s classic Pride and Prejudice. The response from some die-hard Austen fans was swift and predictably brutal.” A. Alter, The New York Times

ESL Voices Lesson Plan for this post with Answer Key

Book Eligible by Curtis Sittenfeld

Book Eligible by Curtis Sittenfeld

Excerpt: Curtis Sittenfeld Is No Jane Austen… A. Alter, The New York Times

“Ms. Sittenfeld, author of the best-selling novels Prep and American Wife, seems almost sheepish when discussing the daunting task she had set for herself. Her novel Eligible, which Random House will release on Tuesday, is the latest book in the Austen Project, a series that pairs contemporary novelists with Austen’s six works… But updating Pride and Prejudice poses a unique challenge.

Pride and PrejudiceOf all of Austen’s works, it is far and away the most popular. It has been adapted into dozens of spinoff books, including murder mysteries (P. D. James’s lurid Death Comes to Pemberley) and horror stories (Seth Grahame-Smith’s blood-soaked parody Pride and Prejudice and Zombies) There are Pride and Prejudice theme books for every age group and demographic, including cookbooks, coloring books, young adult novels, board books for toddlers and comic books. So what led Ms. Sittenfeld, 40, an acclaimed writer who has published four earlier novels, to enter the hypersaturated market for Jane Austen fan fiction?

Like millions of other readers, she happens to be a huge Austen fan. And while she knew that rewriting Pride and Prejudice was professionally risky, she was driven partly by the same impulse that compelled devoted Austenphiles to reread the novel dozens of times: She wanted to spend more time with the characters.

Eligible by Curtis Sittenfeld

Eligible by Curtis Sittenfeld

I see Eligible as a homage, and I see Pride and Prejudice as a perfect book, she said. You can dispute whether this project is a good idea, but you can’t dispute my fondness for the novel.”

 Visit Grades 9-12 Lesson Plan for Pride and Prejudice Cover art- dailylit

ESL Voices Lesson Plan for this post

NOTE: Lessons can also be used with native English speakers.

Level: Intermediate – Advanced


Language Skills: Reading, writing, and speaking. Vocabulary and grammar activities are included.


Time: Approximately 2 hours.

Materials: Student handout (from this lesson) and access to news article.


Objective: Students will read and discuss the article
with a focus on improving reading comprehension and learning new vocabulary. At the end of the lesson students will express their personal views on the topic through group work and writing.

I. Pre-Reading Activities

Stimulating background knowledge: Brainstorming

Directions: Place students in groups, ask students to think about what they already know about  the topic.  Next, have students look at the picture(s) in the text and generate ideas or words that may be connected to the article. Debrief as a class and list these ideas on the board. Students can use a brainstorming chart for assistance.

Brainstorming chart by UIE copy

II. While Reading Tasks

Word Inference

Directions: Students are to infer the meanings of the words in bold taken from the article. They may use a dictionary, thesaurus, and Word Chart for assistance.

  1. Some might say it takes hubris  to rewrite a classic.
  2. Pride and Prejudice poses a unique challenge.
  3. It has been adapted into dozens of spinoff books.
  4. The characters and plot are interesting.
  5. The author was driven by  a strange impulse to write.
  6. I see Eligible as a homage.
  7. You can dispute whether this project is a good idea.
  8. You can’t dispute my fondness for the novel.
  9. The novel features a headstrong heroine.
  10. She  uses her own brand of satire on the timeless plot.
Vocabulary Organizer by Against the Odds

Vocabulary Organizer by Against the Odds

Reading Comprehension

Fill-ins

Directions: Place students in groups and after they have read the entire article, have them complete the following sentences taken from the article. They can use the words and terms from the list provided, or provide their own terms. They are to find the meanings of any new vocabulary.

There were no___. But it___ became___that Ms. Sittenfeld could probably ___any urgent “Pride and Prejudice” questions without ___the source. She more or less ___the ___to memory when she carefully___out the novel’s 61___, in an ___to create a blueprint of sorts for her own___.

Word List: mapped, evident, plot, committed, chapters,

version, effort, emergencies, quickly, handle, consulting,

 Grammar Focus: Structure and Usage

Directions: The following groups of sentences are from the article. One of the sentences in each group contains a grammatical  error. Students are to identify the sentence (1, 2, or 3 ) from each group that contains the grammatical error.

I

The characters and plot  is kind of in our air.

There are theme books for every age group.

Of Austen’s works, it is the most popular.

II

Like millions of other readers, she is a huge Austen fan.

She committed the plot on memory.

She created her own version.

III

Jane is approaching spinsterhood.

A rich single man  come to town.

Lizzy takes an instant dislike to his richer friend.

III. Post Reading Tasks

WH-How Questions

Directions: Have students use the  WH-question format to discuss or to write the main points from the article.

Who or What is the article about?

Where does the action/event take place?

When does the action/event take place?

Why did the action/event occur?

How did the action/event occur?

Discussion/Writing Exercise

Directions: Place students in groups and have them  discuss the following statements. Afterwards, have the groups share their thoughts as a class. To reinforce the ideas, students can write an essay on one of the following discussion topics.

1. “The novel has already proved polarizing among Austen fans. Sadly disappointing, this book is just trying to cash in on the popularity of Austen’s characters, one angry reader wrote on Goodreads. A critic for Kirkus Reviews warned, Don’t expect to get the same level of romantics and Darcy-inflicted swoon that make the original untouchable.”

2. Have each group list 3  questions they would like to pursue in relation to the focus of the topic.

1-Minute Free Writing Exercise

Directions: Allow students 1 minute to write down one new idea they’ve learned from the reading. Ask them to write down one thing they did not understand in the reading. Review the responses as a class. Note: For the lower levels allow more time for this writing activity.

ANSWER KEY

Category: Literature

The Gift That Keeps Giving: ‘The Gift of the Magi’

“Just over 105 years ago, William Sydney Porter sat in a dim, high-backed booth—the third one from the window—in Pete’s Tavern on Irving Place, which cross-sects the Gramercy area of Manhattan. While patrons drank at the adjacent rosewood bar—he sat and penned one of the most enduring love stories to come after the turn of the 20th century. That writer is better known as O. Henry, and according to legend—a plaque commemorates that booth at Pete’s over a century later—he scripted his famous The Gift of the Magi  there.” K. Fallon, The Atlantic

Book Gift of the Magi by O. Henry

Book Gift of the Magi by O. Henry

ESL Voices Lesson Plan for Gift of the Magi with Answer Key

Excerpt: The Gift of ‘The Gift of the Magi’ By Kevin Fallon, The Atlantic

“The indelible short story was first published on December 10, 1905 in the New York Sunday World Magazine. O. Henry was among the most popular writers of his day, with Magi being published at the height of his fame. The tale, a simply structured, exquisitely told story of self-sacrifice, generosity, and love, closed with the O. Henry signature: an ironic twist.

O. Henry- 1862-1910. In 2012 the U.S. Postal Service issued a commemorative stamp to observe the sesquicentennial of O. Henry's birth.

O. Henry- 1862-1910. In 2012 the U.S. Postal Service issued a commemorative stamp to observe the sesquicentennial of O. Henry’s birth.

From its opening the story is relatable; destitution is a theme that will never lose relevance. Della and Jim are 22-year-old newlyweds, earning a $20 a week income, and living in a humble apartment—the kind furnished with a shabby little couch and pier-glass window panes.

The Gift of the Magi by O. Henry

The Gift of the Magi by O. Henry

She had been saving every penny she could for months… So deeply in love with her husband, Della can’t bear not giving him a Christmas gift and sells off her hair to purchase a fob chain for his watch… we discover that he has pawned the watch to afford the tortoise-shell combs Della had been eyeing to comb her hair.  In the age where shoppers line up at 3 am to buy a HDTV at a 10 percent discount, perhaps the story constantly resurfaces to serve as a sort of moral compass, steering us back on course to the season of giving.It’s a reminder of the way we should be living, with love first, giving second, and possession below all.”

WISHING EVERYONE HAPPY HOLIDAYS!

~ESL VOICES~

Design by webarts

Design by webarts

ESL Voices Lesson Plan for Gift of the Magi

Level: Intermediate -Advanced

Language Skills: reading, writing, speaking and listening. Vocabulary activities are included.

Time: approximately 2 hours.

Materials:  Copy of story The Gift Of The Magi,  biography of O. Henry, examples of Components for Literary Analysis, and access to the video below.

Objectives:  Students will  read and discuss the short story The Gift of the Magi by O. Henry. Students will achieve a better understanding of the story by learning literary devices and terms  (e.g., imagery, symbolism, setting,) used for analyzing stories.  They will also learn how to  analyze the relationship between characters, and events in the story by using these literary devices.

I. Pre-Reading Exercises

Analyzing headings and photos

Directions:  Ask students to read the title of the short story. Then, have them  examine the photo carefully. Based on these sources,  ask students to create a list of  words and  ideas  that they think might be related to this article.

 Discussion Questions

Directions: Have students discuss the following questions.

The Gift of the Magi is a story about a young married couple who are very poor. This story tells of  how they handle the challenge of  secretly buying Christmas gifts for each other with very little money to spend. The questions below ask you to think about gifts and their value.  Discuss your ideas with your class members.

1. In your opinion what makes a gift  valuable?

2. Describe the most valuable gift you have ever received.

3. What was the most valuable gift you have given someone?

II. While Reading Tasks

Vocabulary:  Word Inference

Directions: Place students in groups and have them infer the meanings of the words in bold font taken from the story. They can use this great Vocabulary Chart by Learnnc.org as a guide.

Vocabulary Cluster By Learnnc.org

Vocabulary Cluster By Learnnc.org

  1. This is a  story about the meaning of true love and unselfishness.
  2. Della sat  down on the shabby little couch and howled.
  3. They lived in a furnished flat at $8 per week.
  4. In the vestibule below was a letter-box. 
  5. Expenses had been greater than she had calculated.
  6. Suddenly she whirled from the window and stood before the glass
  7. There were two possessions of the James Dillingham Youngs in which they both took a mighty pride.
  8. Once she faltered for a minute.
  9. She was ransacking the stores for Jim’s present.
  10. He simply stared at her fixedly with that peculiar expression on his face.
Prediction and Character Organizer Charts

Directions: Students may use these Prediction and Character  profile charts by Pace High School as  a while-reading tool to aid in  their comprehension of the events and of the characters in the story.

CHARACTER Prediction Chart: Pace High School

CHARACTER Prediction Chart: Pace High School

OUTCOME PREDICTIONS Pace High School

OUTCOME PREDICTIONS Pace High School

 

III. Post Reading Exercises

Questions for Comprehension

Directions: After students have reviewed Components for Literary Analysis have them answer the following questions from the story. 

  1. During what holiday does the story take place?
  2. Identify the characters in the story.
  3. What are the two valuable possessions  belonging to Della and Jim?
  4. How much money did Della have at first to buy Jim’s gift?
  5. What did Della do to get additional money for his gift?
  6. What gift did Della buy for Jim?
  7. How did Jim get additional money to buy Della’s gift?
  8. What gift did Jim buy for Della?
  9. Did things work out the way Jim and Della planned? Explain why or why not.
Questions for Reflection

Directions:  In groups have students discuss the following questions.

  1. What are some of the themes in the story?
  2. What are some of the symbols in the story?
  3. Imagery is descriptive language that creates a picture in the reader’s mind.  Identify some examples of how O. Henry used imagery.
  4. What  does the reference to the magi mean in this story?
Writing Assignment 

Directions: Have students choose a topic from below and write an essay to share with the class.

  1.  Some of the themes in this  story are selfless love, sacrifice, and the frustration of poverty. Choose one of these themes and write an essay describing your thoughts about the theme.
  2.  Write a description for each character  that appears in the story.
  3.  O. Henry is famous for the surprise endings in his stories. In The Gift of The Magi  the surprise is that both Jim and Della sacrificed their most cherished possession for the other. See if you can write a different “surprise” ending for the story. Share your ending with the class.
IV. Listening Activity  

Video Clip:  O. Henry’s The Gift of the Magi (Free Audio Book) 

Questions for Discussion (Listening)

• After listening to the story, do you feel that you understand it better?   If yes, describe in what way. If no, explain why not.

• Do you prefer the written or aural version of The Gift of the Magi? Provide reasons for your choice.

Additional Activities for Students

Student Interactive: Comic Stories

Directions: In groups have students create short comic strips depicting the events of this short story. Students can vary the dialog of the characters for fun. For a good comic-strip generator visit:  Read Write and Think

Students Write Different Endings

Directions: Have each group write a different ending to the story and share them with the class.

ANSWER KEY: The Gift of the Magi

Category: Literature | Tags:

New Classic Lesson Plans with Answer Keys

ESL Voices has added the following Classic Lesson Plans with Answer Keys:

The Doctor and the Doctor’s Wife by Ernest Hemingway

The Gift of the Magi by O. Henry

Visit  Other Classic Lesson Plans in the ESL Voices Library

Classics: Lesson Plans

Below are the lesson plans based on the short stories in the Classic section of the ESL Voices Library. They are listed by the author’s last name. Note that Lessons by various authors will be added on a continuing basis.

The Child’s Story By Charles Dickens

Indian Camp By Ernest Hemingway

The Doctor and the Doctor’s Wife By Ernest Hemingway

Soldier’s Home By Ernest Hemingway

Cat In The Rain By Ernest Hemingway

The Last Leaf By O. Henry

The Gift of the Magi by O. Henry

Category: Literature | Tags: ,

Michigan: Hemingway’s Secret Shangri-La

“In 1898, the year before Ernest Hemingway was born, his parents bought 200 feet of frontage on Walloon Lake in northern Michigan, out in the backlands of Petoskey, a coastal resort town… Yet even Hemingway fans might draw a blank on his Michigan connection. Havana, Key West, Ketchum, Paris, Pamplona — these locales tend to conjure vintage Papa: a kerchiefed, bloated, rum-drunk Nobel laureate. Petoskey? Not so much. The gatekeepers of Hemingway’s legend have largely ignored the place… But if you want to understand the writer, you have to start here.” J. O’Connor, NYT

ESL Voices Lesson Plan for this post with Answer Key

Young Hemingway on Walloon Lake Mchigan. Photo credit- JFKlibrary

Young Hemingway on Walloon Lake Mchigan. Photo credit- JFKlibrary

 Walloon Lake Northern Michigan. Photo credit cbgreatlakes

Walloon Lake Northern Michigan. Photo credit cbgreatlakes

Excerpt:  |When Hemingway Was a Young Fisherman in Michigan By John O’Connor, The New York Times

“Absolutely the best trout fishing in the country. No exaggeration, he [Hemingway] later wrote to a friend about the Petoskey area, perhaps exaggerating a tad but hitting on an essential truth of summer in the Michigan boonies: It’s a great place to laze around and swim and fish when you want to. And the best place in the world to do nothing. It is beautiful country … And nobody knows about it but us.

A young Hemingway poses with fish that he caught in Wallon Lake in Michigan 1916. Photo credit metrotimes.com

A young Hemingway poses with fish that he caught in Wallon Lake in Michigan 1916. Photo credit metrotimes.com

By all accounts, northern Michigan had a seismic effect on Ernest Hemingway and his future work. It was a place where men lived hard and lean, ran trotlines and considered bilge water a beverage. Good stuff for essays, he wrote in a 1916 journal entry, recording fishing trip details he would later channel into Nick Adams stories.

Little Traverse Bay. Photo credit michigan.org

Little Traverse Bay. Photo credit michigan.org

It’s an odd juxtaposition to think of Hemingway, years later, sipping espresso in Paris cafes while writing about Nick Adams — a semi-autobiographical stand-in for the author’s own manly wanderings in the Michigan wilds…Probably the river most people associate with Hemingway is the Two-Hearted in the Upper Peninsula, thanks to Big Two-Hearted River. An archetype of minimalism, the story depicts Adams as a veteran wrestling with the trauma of war while trout fishing in deepest Michigan. Northern Michigan was his first Eden, and it got seared into his emotions. From that came great stories.”

Ernest Hemingway July 21, 1899-July 2, 1961

Additional Lesson Plans for stories by Hemingway:

Indian Camp

Soldier’s Home

Cat in the Rain

Read Additional Stories by Ernest Hemingway

Remember: October is Domestic Violence Awareness Month

NATIONAL DOMESTIC VIOLENCE AWARENESS MONTH, 2013 Photo- dcmilitary.

ESL Voices Lesson Plan for this post

Level: Intermediate – Advanced
Language Skills: Reading, writing, and speaking. Vocabulary and grammar activities are included.

Time: Approximately 2 hours.

Materials: Student handout (from this lesson) and access to news article.

Objective: Students will read and discuss the article
with a focus on improving reading comprehension and learning new vocabulary. At the end of the lesson students will express their personal views on the topic through group work and writing.

I. Pre-Reading Activities

 Predictions: Using a Pre-reading Organizer

Directions:  Ask students to examine the title of the post and of the actual article they are about to read. Then, have them  examine the photos. Ask students to write a paragraph describing what they think this article will discuss. Students can use a Pre-reading organizer for assistance.

Pre-reading Organizer By Scholastic

Pre-reading Organizer By Scholastic

II. While Reading Tasks

Word Inference

Directions: Students are to infer the meanings of the words in bold taken from the article. They may use a dictionary, thesaurus, and Word Chart for assistance.

  1. The Hemingways were fresh off a luxury steamship.
  2. They were looking to  leave the suburbs.
  3. Hemingway did not exaggerate about trout fishing in Michigan.
  4. Northern Michigan had a seismic effect on Ernest Hemingway.
  5. He noted fishing trip details he would later channel into Nick Adams stories.
  6. It’s an odd juxtaposition to think of Hemingway, years later, sipping espresso in Paris cafes.
  7. It’s beautiful to see Michigan’s  terraced farmland dusted with pollen.
  8. Hemingway has several hallowed fishing spots.
  9. The story  Big Two-Hearted River is an archetype of minimalism.
  10. The village of Horton Bay was a major fixture of Hemingway’s adolescence.
Vocabulary Cluster By Learnnc.org

Vocabulary Cluster By Learnnc.org

Reading Comprehension

Word -Recognition

Directions: Students choose the correct word to complete the sentences taken from the article. They are to choose from the options presented.

Despite/spite having gown/grown up three/thee hours south of Petoskey and having fished many/money of the locust/local waters that Hemingway did, I couldn’t recall/recalls ever sitting/setting foot in the town. Nowadays I live out East and rarely/rare find my way back home. And so, in June, I finally maid/made it to Michigan, intent/intense on tracing Hemingway’s boyhood obit/orbit and seeing the country where Nick Adams came of age.

 Grammar Focus: Preposition Exercise

Prepositions:  in, for, of, with, by,  on, at, to, as, into, across, around, over,  through, from, during, up, off,

Directions: The following sentences are from the news article.  For each sentence choose the correct preposition from the choices listed above. Note that not all prepositions listed are in the article.

The Petoskey area is absolutely the best trout fishing ___the country. And the best place ___the world___ do nothing.

Driving___ the east coast___ Lake Michigan___ Glen Arbor, I cut___the pinkie of Michigan’s mitten to Traverse City.

___ Petoskey, which sits ___a bluff overlooking Little Traverse Bay, a warm breeze swept ____the lake and wheeled and skidded___the streets.

III. Post Reading Tasks

WH-How Questions

Directions: Have students use the  WH-question format to discuss or to write the main points from the article.

Who or What is the article about?

Where does the action/event take place?

When does the action/event take place?

Why did the action/event occur?

How did the action/event occur?

Discussion/Writing Exercise

Directions: Place students in groups and have them answer the following questions. Afterwards, have the groups share their thoughts as a class. To reinforce the ideas, students can write an essay on one of the following discussion topics.

  1. The following  two statements were taken from the article. Rephrase each statement in your own words, then discuss the meaning with the members of your group.

“It’s an odd juxtaposition to think of Hemingway, years later, sipping espresso in Paris cafes while writing about Nick Adams — a semi-autobiographical stand-in for the author’s own manly wanderings in the Michigan wilds.”

“Lots of people dislike Hemingway for some pretty good reasons, like machine-gunning mako sharks from his boat or the ugly vein of misogyny, homophobia and anti-Semitism that litters his fiction and personal correspondence.”

3-2-1-Writing

Directions: Allow students 5 minutes to write down three new ideas they’ve learned about Ernest Hemingway from the article,  two things they did not understand, and one thing they would like to know that the article did not mention. Review the responses as a class.

ANSWER KEY

Category: Literature | Tags: ,