Sensitive Clothing for Autistic Kids

“Wearing a Sensewear jacket isn’t like wearing an ordinary jacket. It doesn’t just keep you warm; it can kind of hug you, thanks to its inflatable lining. When you throw on a Sensewear scarf, it does more than wrap around your neck. It can also emit soothing aromas that bring back pleasant memories. In general, Sensewear isn’t ordinary apparel. It’s a wild-looking line of prototype clothing designed as an example of how apparel could help treat people with sensory perception disorders… common among people with autism.” M. Rhodes, Wired.com

ESL Voices Lesson Plan for this post with Answer Key

The smart squeeze jacket is a type of garment created for individuals with autism.. .it provides a sort of deep pressure therapy to create a sensory calming effect. Photo- SmartSqueeze-Uncreative.com

The smart squeeze jacket is a type of garment created for individuals with autism.. .it provides a sort of deep pressure therapy to create a sensory calming effect. Photo- SmartSqueeze-Uncreative.com

Excerpt: This Odd-looking clothing is designed to help Autistic Kids. Margaret Rhodes, Wired.com

“You won’t exactly find it in Uniqlo anytime soon. It’s a wild-looking line of prototype clothing designed as an example of how apparel could help treat people with sensory perception disorders. Emanuela Corti and Ivan Parati, Dubai-based designers who make up the Caravan design collective, imagine the collection of jackets, shirts, and scarves as sort of garment-therapist prototypes for people who undergo sensory occupational therapy.Their central nervous systems struggle to receive and organize sensory stimuli correctly, leaving them either overly sensitive to stimuli, or not quite sensitive enough.

Some autistic children wander, unbeknownst to their parents or even themselves, but new GPS wearables can help ease the worries of lost kids.

Some autistic children wander, unbeknownst to their parents or even themselves, but new GPS wearables can help ease the worries of lost kids.

The Sensewear line imagines clothes as a toolkit for handling those uncomfortable sensory moments. Because they’re modular the way all clothes are, they easily adapt to different situations. Most importantly, they let patients learn to self-soothe, which empowers them and could take pressure off therapists.

Another clothing line, Independence Day Clothing was started by former CNN correspondent, Lauren Thierry, whose teenage son, Liam, has autism.

Another clothing line, Independence Day Clothing was started by former CNN correspondent, Lauren Thierry, whose teenage son, Liam, has autism.

They look outlandish and impractical, but integrated into each one is an idea for dealing with a different kind of sensory interaction. The jacket, for instance, has an inflatable lining and a hand pump, so the wearer can mechanically induce a pressurized, hugging feeling similar to an infant being swaddled. 

To keep clothing from feeling constricting, the joints all have a perforated design for plenty of flexible movement. CARAVAN DESIGN

To keep clothing from feeling constricting, the joints all have a perforated design for plenty of flexible movement. CARAVAN DESIGN

The last piece is a pullover with a stretchy hood, for people with sensitivity to noise. You can burrow inside it and create your own custom acoustic chamber. Because they are, ultimately, just clothes (and will soon likely be less bizarre-looking than Sensewear’s creations) they can do a lot of good and little harm.”

ESL Voices Lesson Plan for this post

Level: Intermediate – Advanced
Language Skills: Reading, writing, and speaking. Vocabulary and grammar activities are included.

Time: Approximately 2 hours.

Materials: Student handout (from this lesson) and access to news article.

Objective: Students will read and discuss the article
with a focus on improving reading comprehension and learning new vocabulary. At the end of the lesson students will express their personal views on the topic through group work and writing.

 Predictions: Using a Pre-reading Organizer

Directions:  Ask students to examine the title of the post and of the actual article they are about to read. Then, have them  examine the photos. Ask students to write a paragraph describing what they think this article will discuss. Students can use a Pre-reading organizer for assistance.

Pre-reading Organizer By Scholastic

Pre-reading Organizer By Scholastic

II. While Reading Tasks

Word Inference

Directions: Students are to infer the meanings of the words in bold taken from the article. They may use a dictionary, thesaurus, and Word Chart for assistance.

  1. Sensewear is a  wild-looking line of prototype clothing.
  2. This apparel could help treat people with sensory disorders.
  3. The central nervous system struggles to receive and organize sensory stimuli correctly.
  4. This manifests in many ways.
  5. They let patients learn to self-soothe, which empowers them.
  6. The prototype line won the prestigious Lexus Design Award.
  7. They look outlandish and impractical.
  8. The special jacket has an inflatable lining.
  9. The wearer can burrow inside it.
  10. All these clothes are meant to be incredibly versatile.
Color Vocabualry Map by Enchanted Learning

Color Vocabualry Map by Enchanted Learning

Reading Comprehension Word -Recognition

Directions: Students are to circle or underline the correct word or phrases from the article. This exercise reinforces students’ attention on words that have been introduced in the reading. Have them skim the article to check their responses. Students should also find the meanings for all unknown words.

All these clothes/clues are meant/mean to be incredibly verse/versatile. Corti and Parati—who were future/furniture and product/packet designers before working on Sensewear—worked with research/researchers at the Dubai Autism Center, who told them that sensory/senses reactions vary/vie with every person in therapy. Every kind/kid reacts in a different way to the therapist, so they have to try everything with them.

Grammar Focus: Structure and Usage

Directions: The following groups of sentences are from the article. One of the sentences in each group contains a grammatical error. Students are to identify the sentence (1, 2, or 3 ) from each group that contains the grammatical error.

I

  1. It’s a wild-looking line of prototype clothing.
    2. It help to treat people with sensory perception disorders.
    3. The collection consists of jackets, shirts, and scarves.

II

  1. The Sensewear line imagines clothes as a toolkit.
    2. Most importantly, they let patients learn to self-soothe.
    3. There are two scarf: an aromatic model and another that’s meant to provide pressure.

III

  1. The last piece are a pullover.
    2. Every kid reacts in a different way.
    3. People with autism have unique hacks for handling sensory issues.

III. Post Reading Tasks

WH-How Questions

Directions: Have students use the WH-question format to discuss or to write the main points from the article.

Who or What is the article about?
Where does the action/event take place?
When does the action/event take place?
Why did the action/event occur?

Discussion/Writing Exercise

Directions: Place students in groups and have them answer the following questions. Afterwards, have the groups share their thoughts as a class. To reinforce the ideas, students can write an essay on one of the following discussion topics.

1. The following two statements were taken from the article. Rephrase each statement in your own words, then discuss the meaning with the members of your group.

“Sensory processing disorders are common among people with autism. Their central nervous systems struggle to receive and organize sensory stimuli correctly, leaving them either overly sensitive to stimuli, or not quite sensitive enough. This manifests in many ways, but here’s one example… you know that scratchy feeling you get from a tag in a new T-shirt? Imagine that agitation multiplied by 10, or 20: that’s what a dysfunctional sensory perception can feel like.”
“Koenig calls garments a universal design that really helps the group of people affected, and doesn’t hurt anyone else, akin to wheelchair curb cuts in the sidewalk, or screen-printing tags in clothing instead of sewing on cloth ones. Because they are, ultimately, just clothes (and will soon likely be less bizarre-looking than Sensewear’s creations) they can do a lot of good and little harm.”

3-2-1-Writing

Directions: Allow students 5 minutes to write down three new ideas they’ve learned about clothing for Autistic children from the reading, two things they did not understand in the reading, and one thing they would like to know that the article did not mention. Review the responses as a class.

ANSWER KEY

Category: Autism | Tags:

The Truth about Selfies and Your Personality

“Cremated remains, xylophones and lawn chairs are not allowed in the Magic Kingdom, and now selfie sticks aren’t either… selfie sticks were also forbidden at the Coachella music festival and Comic-Con — hardly known as bastions of decorum. Much of the research on selfies reveals that (surprise!) people who take a lot of them tend to have narcissistic, psychopathic and Machiavellian personality traits — which may explain why they are oblivious when they bonk you on the head with their selfie sticks.” K. Murphy, New York Times

ESL Voices Lesson Plan for this post with Answer Key

Photo- fox5sandiego.com

Photo- fox5sandiego.com

Excerpt: What Selfie Sticks Really Tell Us About Ourselves By Kate Murphy, New York Times

“Since the advent of front-facing cameras on cellphones, selfies have been a matter of eye-rolling and vague embarrassment even among those who take them (often making a pouty lip “duckface” if female or asymmetrically setting the eyebrows if male).

The Selfie queens- Beyonce, Rihanna and Nicki Minaj. Photo- tumblr

The Selfie queens- Beyonce, Rihanna and Nicki Minaj. Photo- tumblr

Now, though, it seems a line has been drawn at mounting a camera phone on a perspective-enhancing stick — as if to confine selfies’ intrusion into society to at most arm’s length.

The Most Dangerous Selfies Ever Taken-Photo- article.wn.com

The Most Dangerous Selfies Ever Taken-Photo- article.wn.com

Psychologists, technologists, behavioral economists, art historians and futurists differ in their interpretations of the selfie and the risks people are willing to take socially and physically to snap them…People forget that narcissism is not just about being an egomaniac —

Photo- article.wn.com

Photo- article.wn.com

it’s also driven by underlying insecurity, said Jesse Fox, an assistant professor at Ohio State University’s School of Communication who studies the personalities of selfie takers. They need to get likes’ to get validation…

Photo-forums.thesims

Photo-forums.thesims

The American Academy of Facial Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery reports a marked increase in demand for cosmetic surgery as people become disappointed comparing their selfies with the images they see in the mirror.

Photo credit- Tim Enthoven-NYT

Photo credit- Tim Enthoven-NYT

And as facial recognition software continues to improve, frequent selfie takers may also be giving away their very identity. The more you post pictures of yourself online, the better companies, government agencies and criminals are able to identify you, not only online but sitting in a restaurant or walking down the street… Bad news for devotees of the duckface.”

ESL Voices Lesson Plan for this post

Level: Intermediate – Advanced
Language Skills: Reading, writing, and speaking. Vocabulary and grammar activities are included.

Time: Approximately 2 hours.

Materials: Student handout (from this lesson) and access to news article.

Objective: Students will read and discuss the article
with a focus on improving reading comprehension and learning new vocabulary. At the end of the lesson students will express their personal views on the topic through group work and writing.

I. Pre-Reading Activities

KWL Chart

Directions: Have students use the KWL chart to list the information they already know about “selfies”.  Later in the Post- Reading segment of the lesson, students can fill in what they’ve learned about the topic.

KWL  chart from Michigan State University.

KWL chart from Michigan State University.

II. While Reading Tasks

Word Inference

Directions: Students are to infer the meanings of the words in bold taken from the article. They may use a dictionary, thesaurus, and Word Chart for assistance.

  1. Since the advent cellphones selfies have become popular.
  2. Fatal accidents  are caused by self-portraits in precarious poses.
  3. People forget that narcissism is driven by insecurity.
  4. People need to get ‘likes’ to get validation.
  5. People get obsessed with selfies.
  6. It’s an addictive drug.
  7. We are so bombarded by media telling us how we should look.
  8. There is the  basic need to be acknowledged, or even adored.
  9. The recent selfie-stick bans are for safety.
  10. The selfie phenomenon is more a cultural movement.
Word Map from Education Oasis.

Word Map from Education Oasis.

Reading Comprehension

True /False/NA-Statements

Directions: Review the following statements from the reading. If a statement is true they mark it T. If the statement is  not applicable, they mark it NA. If the statement is false they mark it F and provide the correct answer.

  1. Duckface is an expression often used by people swimming.
  2. Psychologists differ in their interpretations of the selfie and the risks people are willing to take.
  3. Selfie sticks were banned due to public safety concerns.
  4. There have been a series of fatal accidents resulting from self-portraits in precarious poses.
  5. Older people never post selfies.
  6. People who take a lot of selfies tend to have narcissistic personality traits.
  7. Research suggests people are more likely to text selfies when they happy.
  8. People in the U.S. post the most selfies.
  9. With filters and apps people can make themselves look better.
  10. Frequent selfie takers may also be giving away their identity.

 Grammar Focus: Preposition Exercise

Prepositions:  in, for, of, with, by,  on, at, to, as, into, around, over,  from, during,

Directions: The following sentences are from the news article.  For each sentence choose the correct preposition from the choices listed above. Note that not all prepositions listed are in the article.

Since the advent___front-facing cameras___ cellphones, selfies have been a matter___ eye-rolling and vague embarrassment. ___ if ___ confine selfies’ intrusion___ society___ ___ most arm’s length. Moreover, studies show that regular users___social media tend ___ score lower___ measures___ belonging and meaningful existence if they are precluded ___posting content and feel ostracized if they don’t get “likes”.

III. Post Reading Tasks

WH-How Questions

Directions: Have students use the  WH-question format to discuss or to write the main points from the article.

Who or What is the article about?

Where does the action/event take place?

When does the action/event take place?

Why did the action/event occur?

KWL Chart

Directions:  Have students  fill in the last column of the KWL chart if they used one in the pre-reading segment of this lesson.

Discussion/Writing Exercise

Directions: Place students in groups and have them answer the following questions. Afterwards, have the groups share their thoughts as a class. To reinforce the ideas, students can write an essay on one of the following discussion topics.

1. The following  two statements were taken from the article. Rephrase each statement in your own words, then discuss the meaning with the members of your group.

“People forget that narcissism is not just about being an egomaniac — it’s also driven by underlying insecurity,  They need to get ‘likes’ to get validation.”

“…selfies can also be seen as simply another form of communication. After all, a text is only 160 characters but a picture is worth a thousand words. And many in the technology field argue that selfies are a source of empowerment because they grant individuals a high degree of control over how they present themselves to the world.”

2. Do you or someone you know take selfies? If so,  describe the occasions. How often do you take selfies?

3. In your opinion, is taking selfies a good idea? Why or why not?

ANSWER KEY

Category: Social Issues | Tags:

Jon Stewart: “Not Goodbye, I’m going to go get a drink.”

“After 16 years of taking satirical aim at the hypocrisy of politics and the fatuousness of the news media, Jon Stewart said goodbye to The Daily Show on Thursday evening with a farewell broadcast that mixed wry parting shots with earnest displays of emotion and with a passionate speech urging his audience not to accept falsehoods and misinformation in their lives.” D. Itzkoff- NYT

ESL Voices Lesson Plan for this post  with Answer Key

Jon Stewart- rather than saying goodbye or good night, I’m just going to say- I’m going to go get a drink. Photo- Interrobang.com

Jon Stewart- Not saying goodbye or good night. Photo- Interrobang.com

Excerpt: Jon Stewart Signs Off From ‘Daily Show’ With Wit and Sincerity By Dave Itzkoff, New York Times
“Mr. Stewart, 52, who has presided over this Comedy Central news-parody show since 1999, concluded his final episode with a spirited sermon against what he euphemistically described as social-contract fertilizer. (He also used a familiar and much stronger epithet.)

Jon Stewart takes the reins as anchor of The Daily Show in 1999 . Photo- Time

Jon Stewart takes the reins as anchor of The Daily Show in 1999 . Photo- Time

Blatant mendacity, Mr. Stewart said, has become ubiquitous and pernicious. Whenever something’s been titled Freedom Family Fairness Health America, take a good long sniff…The broadcast began with what appeared to be a traditional opening act in which Mr. Stewart poked fun at a current event — in this case, the Republican presidential debates in Cleveland.
But this was simply a setup for the many on-air correspondents and contributors who have passed through “The Daily Show” during Mr. Stewart’s time on the show to pay their final tributes.
Among the celebrated alumni who gave their testimonials, Steve Carell, who went on to become the star of NBC’s The Office and films like Foxcatcher, joked that he had never really left The Daily Show.

President Obama jokingly told Mr. Stewart- I’m issuing a new executive order that Jon Stewart cannot leave the show. It’s being challenged in the courts. Credit: Time.com

President Obama jokingly told Mr. Stewart- I’m issuing a new executive order that Jon Stewart cannot leave the show. It’s being challenged in the courts. Credit: Time.com

There were further cameos from John Oliver, Kristen Schaal and Samantha Bee, as well as Mr. Stewart’s Daily Show successor, Trevor Noah, who wandered onto the set with a tape measure. (“Could you give me like 20 more minutes?” Mr. Stewart asked him.)

Mr. Stewart’s Daily Show successor, Trevor Noah, who wandered onto the set with a tape measure.Photo credit- the wrap.com

Mr. Stewart’s Daily Show successor, Trevor Noah, wandered onto the set with a tape measure. Photo credit- the wrap.com

And of course there was a visit from Stephen Colbert, the former Daily Show correspondent and star of Comedy Central’s Colbert Report, who is about to succeed David Letterman as the host of CBS’s Late Show.

Stephen Colbert says goodbye to Jon Stewart. Credit- Comedy Central

Stephen Colbert says goodbye to Jon Stewart. Credit- Comedy Central

You were infuriatingly good at your job, Mr. Colbert told Mr. Stewart. All of us who were lucky enough to work with you for 16 years are better at our jobs because we got to watch you do yours.

Stewart thanked the many people he's worked with on the show, Comedy Central.

Stewart thanked the many people he’s worked with on the show, Comedy Central.

“Nothing ends,” Mr. Stewart said. “It’s just a continuation. It’s a pause in the conversation. So rather than saying goodbye or good night, I’m just going to say: I’m going to go get a drink. And I’m sure I’ll see you guys before I leave.”

ESL Voices Lesson Plan for this post

Level: Intermediate – Advanced
Language Skills: Reading, writing, and speaking. Vocabulary and grammar activities are included.

Time: Approximately 2 hours.

Materials: Student handout (from this lesson) and access to news article.

Objective: Students will read and discuss the article
with a focus on improving reading comprehension and learning new vocabulary. At the end of the lesson students will express their personal views on the topic through group work and writing.

I. Pre-Reading Activities

Stimulating background knowledge: Brainstorming

Directions: Place students in groups, ask students to think about what they already know about  the topic.  Next, have students look at the pictures in the text and generate ideas or words that may be connected to the article.  Discuss as a class and list these ideas on the board. Students can use a brainstorming chart for assistance.

Great Brainstorming chart from Kootation.com

Great Brainstorming chart from Kootation.com

II. While Reading Tasks

Word Inference

Directions: Students are to infer the meanings of the words in bold taken from the article. They may use a dictionary, thesaurus, and Word Chart for assistance.

  1. Mr. Stewart has presided over this Comedy Central news-parody show since 1999.
  2. Vigilance is the only way to combat the intrusions of dishonest people.
  3. Their work is easily detected.
  4. Many celebrated stars gave their testimonials.
  5. There were further cameos from previous guests.
  6. There was a taped montage,  with several of Mr. Stewart’s past targets of ridicule.
  7. In his final weeks in the anchor chair, Mr. Stewart thanked everyone.
  8. Mr. Stewart resisted gauzy nostalgia.
  9. He played a few retrospective montages that emphasized his shortcomings.
  10. None of this discouraged some of Mr. Stewart’s final guests from pleading with him to stick around a little longer.

Reading Comprehension: Word -Recognition

Directions: Students choose the correct word to complete the sentences taken from the article. They are to choose from the options presented.

None of this discouraged/dispirited some of Mr. Stewart’s final guests from pleasing/pleading with him to stick/stuck around a little longer. When President Obama appeared on The Daily Show in July, he jarringly/jokingly told Mr. Stewart: I’m issuing/issued a new executive order/ordering that Jon Stewart cannot leaf/leave the show. It’s being challenged in the courts.

While interviewing his friend and fallow/fellow comedian Denis Leary on Wednesday, Mr. Stewart said he was comfortable with his decision/decide to step down. When you do something that you know/no you will never be as goad/good at something as you were at this, you have to make peace/piece with it, Mr. Stewart said. And I’ve made peace with it.

 Grammar Focus: Structure and Usage

Directions: The following groups of sentences are from the article. One of the sentences in each group contains a grammatical  error. Students are to identify the sentence (1, 2, or 3 ) from each group that contains the grammatical error.

I

  1. Mr. Stewart have presided over this Comedy Central since 1999.
  2. Mr. Stewart poked fun at the Republican presidential debates.
  3. There was a visit from Stephen Colbert.

II

  1. You were infuriatingly good at your job.
  2. All of us was lucky to work with you.
  3. He played a few retrospective montages.

III

  1. None of this discouraged Mr. Stewart’s final guests.
  2. Mr. Stewart were comfortable with his decision to step down.
  3. Mr. Stewart thanked his wife.

III. Post Reading Tasks

WH-How Questions

Directions: Have students use the  WH-question format to discuss or to write the main points from the article.

Who or What is the article about?

Where does the action/event take place?

When does the action/event take place?

Why did the action/event occur?

How did the action/event occur?

Discussion/Writing Exercise

Directions: Place students in groups and have them answer the following questions. Afterwards, have the groups share their thoughts as a class. To reinforce the ideas, students can write an essay on one of the following discussion topics. See ESL Voices Modes of Writing

1. The following  two statements were taken from the article. Rephrase each statement in your own words, then discuss the meaning with the members of your group.

“The only way to combat the relentless intrusions of dishonest people was through vigilance. Their work is easily detected, and looking for it is kind of a pleasant way to pass the time.”

“In a sincere and seemingly unscripted speech, Mr. Colbert told Mr. Stewart that, though Mr. Stewart had previously told his staff members never to thank you because we owe you nothing, this was one of the few times I have known you to be dead wrong.”

1-Minute Free Writing Exercise

Directions: Allow students 1 minute to write down one new idea they’ve learned from the reading. Ask them to write down one thing they did not understand in the reading.  Review the responses as a class. Note: For the lower levels allow more time for this writing activity.

ANSWER KEY

Category: Comedy | Tags:

Disney’s “Inside Out” Relates to Adults Also

“…writer and director Pete Docter of Pixar reached out to us to talk over an idea for a film that would portray how emotions work inside a person’s head and at the same time shape a person’s outer life with other people. He wanted to do this all in the mind of an 11-year-old girl as she navigated a few difficult days in her life…. We ended up serving as scientific consultants for the movie, Inside Out, which was recently released.” D. Keltner and P. Ekman, The New York Times

ESL Voices Lesson Plan for this post with Answer Key

Film Inside:Out- Adults have Emotions  Too-Disney

Film Inside:Out- Adults have Emotions Too-Disney

Inside:Out- Pixar images

Inside:Out- Pixar images

Excerpt: The Science of ‘Inside Out’ Dacher Keltner and Paul Ekman, The NYT

“Our conversations with Mr. Docter and his team were generally about the science related to questions at the heart of the film: How do emotions govern the stream of consciousness? How do emotions color our memories of the past? What is the emotional life of an 11-year-old girl like? (Studies find that the experience of positive emotions begins to drop precipitously in frequency and intensity at that age.)

Riley’s personality is principally defined by Joy, and this is fitting with what we know scientifically. Studies find that our identities are defined by specific emotions, which shape how we perceive the world, how we express ourselves and the responses we evoke in others.

But the real star of the film is Sadness, for “Inside Out” is a film about loss and what people gain when guided by feelings of sadness. Riley loses friends and her home in her move from Minnesota.

Image from film Inside:Out-Disney

Image from film Inside:Out-Disney

Emotions organize — rather than disrupt — rational thinking. Traditionally, in the history of Western thought, the prevailing view has been that emotions are enemies of rationality and disruptive of cooperative social relations.

The Science of Inside Out-Credit Gérard DuBois-NYT

The Science of Inside Out-Credit Gérard DuBois-NYT

We see this in “Inside Out.” Sadness gradually takes control of Riley’s thought processes about the changes she is going through. This is most evident when Sadness adds blue hues to the images of Riley’s memories of her life in Minnesota. Scientific studies find that our current emotions shape what we remember of the past. Other studies find that it is anger (more so than a sense of political identity) that moves social collectives to protest and remedy injustice.”

ESL Voices Lesson Plan for this post

Level: Intermediate – Advanced


Language Skills: Reading, writing, and speaking. Vocabulary and grammar activities are included.


Time: Approximately 2 hours.


Materials: Student handout (from this lesson) and access to news article.


Objective: Students will read and discuss the article
with a focus on improving reading comprehension and learning new vocabulary. At the end of the lesson students will express their personal views on the topic through group work and writing.

I. Pre-Reading Activities

 Predictions: Analyzing headings and photos

Directions:  Have students  examine the titles of the post and of the actual article. After they examine the photos, ask students to create a list of  words and  ideas  that they think might be related to this article. 

II. While Reading Tasks

Word Inference

Directions: Students are to infer the meanings of the words in bold taken from the article. They may use a dictionary, thesaurus, and Word Chart for assistance.

  1. More poignantly, she has entered the preteen years.
  2. We do have some quibbles with the portrayal of sadness.
  3. Sadness is seen as a drag.
  4. How do emotions govern the stream of consciousness?
  5. The film is about how five emotions grapple for control of the mind of an 11-year-old girl.
  6. Riley’s personality is principally defined by Joy.
  7. The film shows  the full array of emotions.
  8. An angry outburst causes Riley to storm upstairs.
  9. Sadness leads Riley to reunite with her parents.
  10. “Inside Out” offers a new approach to sadness.
Vocabulary Organizer by Against the Odds

Vocabulary Organizer by Against the Odds

Reading Comprehension: Fill-ins

Directions: Place students in groups and after they have read the entire article, have them complete the following paragraphs taken from the article. They can use the words and terms from the list provided, or provide their own terms. They are to find the meanings of any new vocabulary.

Other ___find that it is___(more so than a sense of
political identity) that___social collectives to protest and
remedy injustice. Research that one of us has ___has
found that expressions of ___trigger others to ___when we’ve
acted in ways that momentarily violate social norms.
This insight, too, is___ in the movie. You might be
___to think of sadness as a state defined by inaction and
passivity — the ___of any purposeful action. But in “Inside
Out,” as in real life, ___prompts people to unite in response
to loss.

Word List
absence, embarrassment, studies, conducted, dramatized, sadness, anger, forgive, inclined, moves.

Grammar Focus: Using Adjectives to describe pictures

Directions: Have students choose a picture from this lesson and write a descriptive paragraph using adjectives.

III. Post Reading Tasks

WH-How Questions

Directions: Have students use the WH-question format to discuss or to write the main points from the article.

Who or What is the article about?
Where does the action/event take place?
When does the action/event take place?
Why did the action/event occur?
How did the action/event occur?

Discussion/Writing Exercise

Directions: Place students in groups and have them answer the following questions. Afterwards, have the groups share their thoughts as a class. To reinforce the ideas, students can write an essay on one of the following discussion topics.
1.The following statements were taken from the article. Rephrase each statement in your own words, then discuss the meaning with the members of your group.

“We do have some quibbles with the portrayal of sadness in “Inside Out.” Sadness is seen as a drag, a sluggish character that Joy literally has to drag around through Riley’s mind. In fact, studies find that sadness is associated with elevated physiological arousal, activating the body to respond to loss. And in the film, Sadness is frumpy and off-putting. More often in real life, one person’s sadness pulls other people in to comfort and help.”

“But the truth is that emotions guide our perceptions of the world, our memories of the past and even our moral judgments of right and wrong, most typically in ways that enable effective responses to the current situation. For example, studies find that when we are angry we are acutely attuned to what is unfair, which helps animate actions that remedy injustice.”

2. Which emotion is the most constant in your character? (e.g., anger, happiness, sadness,) Why do you think you feel this way most of the time?

3-2-1-Writing

Directions: Allow students 5 minutes to write down three new ideas they’ve learned about emotions from the reading, two things they did not understand in the reading, and one thing they would like to know that the article did not mention. Review the responses as a class.

ANSWER KEY

Category: Film | Tags:

ESL Voices Invites Guest Teachers to Share Lessons!

ESL Voices is in the process of creating a section for Guest teachers.

There are many teachers who have wonderful and creative ways of teaching either second language learners or native English speakers. We realize that many excellent native English lesson plans are great starting points for ESL lessons at all levels.  Hence we plan to accept and present both ESL and native English lesson plans.  We’d like to share as many of these lessons and ideas as possible with other teachers. Teaching plans that are selected will be given full credit.  In addition,  sharing links to teaching sites is a wonderful way to build communications. So if you have a teaching website (your own or the institution where you work) please include it!  This is also a  way for teachers new to the field to become acquainted with ESL methods.

We’ll be selecting approximately 2- 3 lessons per month, and each submission will be reviewed before posting. Teachers will be notified in advanced if their lesson plan is chosen.

The following information provides  guidelines for teachers to send their lessons to be highlighted on the ESL Voices teaching site.

Guidelines:

Please submit the following to:  support.eslv@amerindian7.com

Lesson plan should be no longer than 1 web page (say, up to 3-4  typed physical  pages) and should include the following guidelines.

Your name (or initials)

Email (this will not be visible to the public)

Website link (optional)

Level of students targeted by the plan ( K-elementary, High school to Advanced)

Language Skill  focus  (E.g., speaking, listening, reading, writing)

Topic ( Your favorite)

Time: Approximately how long will the activity take to complete? (e.g., 1-2 hours)

Materials: (if required)

Objective: What will students learn from this lesson?

You do not have to include an answer key, however, please  include the source material  on which your lesson is based. For example, a news article ( include the name of the paper and author) book excerpt (name and author) etc.

Look forward to hearing from you!

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