New: Guest Plans

Hi Everyone,

In addition to our regular  Lesson Plan ( Visions of the Dying) this week ESL Voices is happy to announce that we have received our first Guest Lesson Plan! To see the special Valentine’s Day lesson for Elementary level children, use the “Guest Plans” entry on the main menu. Enjoy!

Category: no category

The Visions of the Dying… Solace for the Living?

“For thousands of years, the dreams and visions of the dying have captivated cultures, which imbued them with sacred import. Anthropologists, theologians and sociologists have studied these so-called deathbed phenomenaIn the modern medical world, such experiences have been noted…But doctors tend to give them a wide berth because ‘we don’t know what the hell they are,’ said Dr. Timothy E. Quill, an expert on palliative care medicine at the University of Rochester Medical Center. Some researchers have surmised that patients and doctors avoid reporting these phenomena for fear of ridicule.” J.Huffman  The New York Times

ESL Voices Lesson Plan for this post with Answer Key

Photo-ibtimes.co

Photo-ibtimes.co

Excerpt: A New Vision for Dreams of the Dying by J. Huffman, NYT

“Now a team of clinicians and researchers led by Dr. Kerr at Hospice Buffalo, an internist who has a doctorate in neurobiology, are seeking to demystify these experiences and understand their role and importance in supporting a good death — for the patient and the bereaved. These events are distinct from near-death experiences, such as those recalled by people revived in intensive care units, said C. Grant, the director of the research team. These are people on a journey towards death, not people who just missed it.

Many dying people see visions of dead relatives and friends as death draws near. metro.co

Many dying people see visions of dead relatives and friends as death draws near. metro.co

Hospice Buffalo, in Cheektowaga, N.Y., cares for 5,000 patients a year, mostly with visits to private homes and nursing facilities. After doctors, nurses, social workers or chaplains ask patients, How have you been sleeping? they often follow up with, Can you recall any dreams?

For their primary study, published in The Journal of Palliative Medicine, the researchers conducted multiple interviews with 59 terminally ill patients admitted to acute care at Hospice Buffalo, a facility furnished in warm woods, with windows that frame views of fountains, gazebos and gardens. Nearly all the patients reported having had dreams or visions. They described the majority of their dreams as comforting. About one in every five was associated with distress, and the remainder felt neutral.

Many dying people see visions of dead relatives and friends as death draws near. metro.co

Many dying people claim to see visions of dead relatives and friends as death draws near. metro.co

This is certainly research in its infancy. The investigators, counselors and palliative care doctors, are trying to identify and describe the phenomena. The huge challenge of this work is to help patients feel more normal and less alone during this unusual experience of dying,” he said. The more we can articulate that people do have vivid dreams and visions, the more we can be helpful.”

ESL Voices Lesson Plan for this post

NOTE: Lessons can also be used with native English speakers.

Level: Intermediate – Advanced


Language Skills: Reading, writing, and speaking. Vocabulary and grammar activities are included.


Time: Approximately 2 hours.


Materials: Student handout (from this lesson) and access to news article.


Objective: Students will read and discuss the article
with a focus on improving reading comprehension and learning new vocabulary. At the end of the lesson students will express their personal views on the topic through group work and writing.

I. Pre-Reading Activities

Predictions: Analyzing headings and photos

Directions:  Have students  examine the titles of the post and of the actual article. After they examine the photos, ask students to create a list of  words and  ideas  that they think might be related to this article. 

II. While Reading Tasks

Word Inference

Directions: Students are to infer the meanings of the words in bold taken from the article. They may use a dictionary, thesaurus, and Word Chart for assistance.

  1. Even the law reveres a dying person’s final words.
  2. Doctors are seeking to demystify these experiences.
  3. This helps the patient and the bereaved.
  4. These are distinct from near-death experiences.
  5. Many people are revived in intensive care units.
  6. Terminally ill patients are admitted to a hospice.
  7. Palliative care doctors are trying to describe the phenomena.
  8. Some people have mystical dreams.
  9. Troubled dreams erupt with excessive energy.
  10. The researchers suggest that such phenomena might even have prognostic value.
Vocabulary Organizer by Against the Odds

Vocabulary Organizer by Against the Odds

 

Reading Comprehension

True /False/NA-Statements

Directions: Review the following statements from the reading.  If  a statement is true they mark it T. If the statement is  not applicable, they mark it NA. If the statement is false they  mark  it F and provide the correct answer. 

  1. The author of this article is dying.
  2. A dying person’s final words  can never be used as evidence.
  3. People dying are the same as people with near-death experiences.
  4. People over 70 usually have visions.
  5. Researchers conducted multiple interviews with 59 terminally ill patients.
  6. At Hospice Buffalo the  facility is furnished in marble with views of the city.
  7. The huge challenge of this work is to help patients feel more normal and less alone.
  8. Young people never have death visions.
  9. The motivation and pressure for these dreams is coming from a place of fear and uncertainty.
  10. Many dying patients  always communicate.

 Grammar Focus: Prepositions

Prepositions:  in, for, of, with,  towards, by,  on, at, to, as, into, across, around, over,  through, from, during, up, off, about

Directions: The following sentences are from the news article.  For each sentence choose the correct preposition from the choices listed above. Note that not all prepositions listed are in the article.

These events are distinct___near-death experiences.

These are people___ a journey ___death.

___one ___every five was associated ___distress.

___this time there is the need ___resolution and even forgiveness.

III. Post Reading Tasks

Directions:  Have students use this advanced organizer from Enchanted Learning to assist them with  discussing  or writing about  the main points from the article.Topic organizer. By Enchanted Learning

Discussion/Writing Exercise

Directions: Place students in groups and have them restate the following two statements in their own words.  Afterwards, have the groups share their thoughts as a class. To reinforce the ideas, students can write an essay on one of the following discussion topics.

“The dreams and visions loosely sorted into categories: opportunities to engage with the deceased; loved ones “waiting;” unfinished business. Themes of love, given or withheld, coursed through the dreams, as did the need for resolution and even forgiveness… Although many patients said they rarely remembered their dreams, these they could not forget.”

“Other research suggests that dreams seem to express emotions that have been building. Tore Nielsen, a dream neuroscience researcher…surmised that at the end of life, such a need becomes more insistent. Troubled dreams erupt with excessive energy. But positive dreams can serve a similar purpose.”

3-2-1-Writing

Directions: Allow students 5 minutes to write down three new ideas they’ve learned about the topic from the reading,  two things they did not understand in the reading, and one thing they would like to know that the article did not mention. Review the responses as a class.

ANSWER KEY

Category: Social Issues

Receipe for Language: English +Cooking!

“For many immigrants, coming to America is full of the unfamiliar — from the language to the food. In Philadelphia, a program aims to help these arrivals settle into their new country by folding English lessons into a cooking class. On a recent Wednesday afternoon, 20 recent immigrants and refugees to the United States streamed into a shiny commercial-size kitchen on the fourth floor of the Free Library of Philadelphia’s central branch. They were here to partake in the library’s take on teaching English as a second language.” N. Roshania, NPR

ESL Voices Lesson Plan for this post with Answer Key

Photo- npr.org

Photo- npr.org

Excerpt: A Cooking Class…For English  By Neema Roshania, NPR

“The program, dubbed Edible Alphabet, is run through the library and Nationalities Service Center, an organization that helps settle refugees when they arrive in Philadelphia. By offering English instruction in the form of a cooking lesson, organizers hope to provide a familiar setting for the students — who hail from over 10 different countries — to connect to each other.

Photo- smapan.org

Photo- smapan.org

It’s been great for us to sort of connect over, Here’s a can of chickpeas. What do you use chickpeas for in your meals? How would you do this differently at home?  says the library’s program administrator, Liz Fitzgerald.

Each class is helmed by both a chef and an English-as-a-second-language instructor. The class starts off with an English lesson focusing on the day’s ingredients. Today, the students are spelling and sounding out words like onion, garlic, tomato and jalapeno.

Photo- yahoo.com

Photo- yahoo.com

After the language lesson is over, they’ll set out to make chana masala and roti together…This is about welcoming new Philadelphians to the city…”There is no better way to do that than to share a meal together.”

ESL Voices Lesson Plan for this post

NOTE: Lessons can also be used with native English speakers.

Level:  Low Intermediate- High Intermediate


Language Skills: Reading, writing, and speaking. Vocabulary and grammar activities are included.


Time: Approximately 2 hours.


Materials: Student handout (from this lesson) and access to news article.


Objective: Students will read and discuss the article
with a focus on improving reading comprehension and learning new vocabulary. At the end of the lesson students will express their personal views on the topic through group work and writing.

Pre-Reading Task

 Predictions: Using a Pre-reading Organizer

Directions:  Ask students to examine the title of the post and of the actual article they are about to read. Then, have them  examine the photos. Ask students to write a paragraph describing what they think this article will discuss. Students can use a Pre-reading organizer for assistance.

Pre-reading chart by J. Swann

Pre-reading chart by J. Swann

 

 While Reading Tasks

Word Inference

Directions: Students are to infer the meanings of the words in bold taken from the article. They may use a dictionary, thesaurus, and Word Chart for assistance.

  1. The program is  dubbed Edible Alphabet.
  2. The program helps settle refugees.
  3. Each class is helmed by both a chef and an ESL teacher.
  4. The program helps people adjust to life in America.
  5. Some students rolled out roti and chopped vegetables.
  6. Saleh was carefully documenting each step.
  7. Many students are sociable.
  8. All the recipes used in the class are pulled from the cookbook.
  9. Learning how to  shop in an American grocery store on limited means is important.
  10. One students says he savors the choices  of foods.
Vocabulary Cluster By Learnnc.org

Vocabulary Cluster By Learnnc.org

Reading Comprehension

Word -Recognition

Directions: Students are to circle or underline the correct word or phrases from the article. This exercise reinforces students’ attention on words that have been introduced in the reading. Have them skim the article to check  their responses. Students should also find the meanings for any  unknown words.

“It’s the third/bird time the class has been caught/taught. And along the way, the instructors/instruct say they’ve learned/leaned some lessons of their own. For instance, Fitzgerald says in the first round of classes, they stated/started off by teaching recipes like quinoa salad. But, they quickly realized the students weren’t dig/digging the flavors. That’s when they started teaching/teach recipes that used flavors and ingredients more familiar to the students, who mostly come from Southeast Asia, Africa and the Middle East.”

 Grammar Focus

Using Adjectives  to describe pictures    

Directions: Have students choose a picture from the article  and write a descriptive paragraph using adjectives.

Click here for a review of Adjectives

III. Post Reading Tasks

Discussion/Writing Exercise

Directions: Place students in groups and have them restate the following two  statements. Afterwards, have the groups share their thoughts as a class. To reinforce the ideas, students can write an essay on one of the following discussion topics.

  1. “Each class is helmed by both a chef and an English-as-a-second-language instructor. The class starts off with an English lesson focusing on the day’s ingredients. Today, the students are spelling and sounding out words like onion, garlic, tomato and jalapeno. After the language lesson is over, they’ll set out to make chana masala and roti together.”
  2. “…the class is about much more than just learning English…learning how to navigate an American grocery store on limited means is an important part of the class. Strawberries, for example, are available in America year-round, but will cost more and won’t taste as good in January.”

Extra: Web Search

Directions: In groups/partners have students “google” the topic and see what additional information they can find. Students can either have further discussions or write an essay about the subject.

ANSWER KEY

Category: Language

Name Your Fear… A New Drug Can Cure It…Maybe

“Who among us hasn’t wanted to let go of anxiety or forget about fear? Phobias, panic attacks and disorders like post-traumatic stress are extremely common… Sitting at the heart of much anxiety and fear is emotional memory — all the associations that you have between various stimuli and experiences and your emotional response to them…. New research suggests that it may be possible not just to change certain types of emotional memories, but even to erase them.” R. Friedman, New York Times

ESL Voices Lesson Plan for this post with Answer Key

Image-

Excerpt: A Drug to Cure Fear by Richard A. Friedman, NYT

“Whether it’s the fear of being embarrassed while talking to strangers (typical of social phobia) or the dread of being attacked while walking down a dark street after you’ve been assaulted (a symptom of PTSD), you have learned that a previously harmless situation predicts something dangerous. 

Photo- telegraph.co.uk

Photo- telegraph.co.uk

It has been an article of faith in neuroscience and psychiatry that, once formed, emotional memories are permanent. Afraid of heights or spiders? The best we could do was to get you to tolerate them, but we could never really rid you of your initial fear. Or so the thinking has gone.

Photo-senselessscrutiny.com

Photo-senselessscrutiny.com

The current standard of treatment for such phobias revolves around exposure therapy. This involves repeatedly presenting the feared object or frightening memory in a safe setting, so that the patient acquires a new safe memory that resides in his brain alongside the bad memory. But if he is re-traumatized or re-exposed with sufficient intensity to the original experience, his old fear will awaken with a vengeance.

This is one of the limitations of exposure therapy, along with the fact that it generally works in only about half of the PTSD patients who try it…Several studies of rats done in 2000 showed that a drug called anisomycin, which blocks the synthesis of proteins in the brain, could reduce fear associations.

In one, researchers taught rats to fear a sound by pairing it with a shock. After the animals were fear-conditioned, they were presented with the sound and then immediately given the drug. When the animals were exposed to the sound again, they no longer appeared afraid; they had forgotten their original fear.

Curiously, there is a very narrow time window after retrieving a fear memory when you can disrupt that memory — hours, in the animal studies — before it closes and the drug has no effect.

Some may view any attempt to tamper with human memory as disturbing because it seems at odds with what we ought to do as a culture with the darker aspects of our history… Some may also argue that it’s a mistake to tinker with our fear responses because they’re natural — they evolved this way for a reason.

People who suffer panic attacks hyperventilate and have an intense desire to flee in situations where there is rarely actual danger. It turns out that panic disorder is associated with an increased sensitivity to carbon dioxide in the brain. If you lived in a cave with a clan of hominid fire-dwellers, you’d have been one of the first to get out when the oxygen supply was dwindling.

Evolutionary design has left us a few million years out of date; we are hard-wired for a Paleolithic world, but have to live in a modern one. The irrational fear of anxiety disorders was once probably useful and lifesaving. No longer.”

ESL Voices Lesson Plan for this post

NOTE: Lessons can also be used with native English speakers.

L2 Student Level: Intermediate – Advanced


Language Skills: Reading, writing, and speaking. Vocabulary and grammar activities are included.


Time: Approximately 2 hours.


Materials: Student handout (from this lesson) and access to news article.


Objective: Students will read and discuss the article
with a focus on improving reading comprehension and learning new vocabulary. At the end of the lesson students will express their personal views on the topic through group work and writing.

I. Pre-Reading Activities

Stimulating background knowledge: Brainstorming

Directions: Place students in groups, ask students to think about what they already know about  the topic.  Next, have students look at the pictures  in the article  and generate ideas or words that may be connected to the article. Debrief as a class and list these ideas on the board. Students can use a brainstorming chart for assistance.

Colorful Brainstorming chart from Live It Magazine.

Colorful Brainstorming chart from Live It Magazine.

II. While Reading Tasks

Word Inference

Directions: Students are to infer the meanings of the words in bold taken from the article. They may use a dictionary, thesaurus, and Word Chart for assistance.

  1. Fear of being attacked while walking down a dark street after you’ve been assaulted is a symptom of PTSD.
  2. A harmless situation can suddenly predict something dangerous.
  3. The best doctors could do was to get you to tolerate them.
  4. They could never really rid you of your initial fear.
  5. The current standard of treatment for such phobias are exposure therapy.
  6. The patient acquires a new safe memory that resides in his brain.
  7. But if he is re-traumatized his old fear will awaken with a vengeance.
  8. This might be a cure for people with arachnophobia.
  9. Exposure to your fear at the right moment, could free you of that fear forever.
  10. We should think twice about casually prescribing stimulants for young people.Word Map Education Oasis

Reading Comprehension

Fill-ins

Directions: Place students in groups and after they have read the entire article, have them complete the following paragraphs taken from the article. They can use the words and terms from the list provided, or provide their own terms. They are to find the meanings for  any new vocabulary.

Anxiety enhances___memory. We all know that — it’s why you can easily ___where you put your___, but will never forget being___.

Indeed, a ___that will be published next month found that the escalating use of ___by the ___in active duty___, including those serving in Iraq and Afghanistan, was strongly correlated with an ___in the rates of___, even when___ for other factors, like the rate of attention deficit ___disorder.

The study___ the use of prescription stimulants, like Ritalin and Adderall, and the rates of PTSD in nearly 26,000 military service members between 2001 and 2008, and found that the ___of PTSD ___along with the prescriptions.

Word List: controlling, increase, forget, emotional, military, stimulants,

examined, increased, incidence, study, hyperactivity, attacked,

wallet, soldiers, PTSD,

 Grammar Focus: Structure and Usage

Directions: The following groups of sentences are from the article. One of the sentences in each group contains a grammatical  error. Students are to identify the sentence (1, 2, or 3 ) from each group that contains the grammatical error.

I.

  1. It has been a article of faith in neuroscience.
  2. This is one of the limitations of exposure therapy.
  3. Their fear did not return even at the end of one year.

II.

  1. Arachnophobes has an emotional memory.
  2. The basic idea is that they are no longer afraid of spiders.
  3. When the animals were exposed to the sound again, they no longer appeared afraid.

III.

  1. There’s a flip side to this story.
  2. Evolutionary design has left us a few million years out of date.
  3. Some may also argue that it’s an mistake to tinker with our fear responses.

III. Post Reading Tasks

WH-How Questions

Directions: Have students use the  WH-question format to discuss or to write the main points from the article.

Who or What is the article about?

Where does the action/event take place?

When does the action/event take place?

Why did the action/event occur?

How did the action/event occur?

Discussion/Writing Exercise

Directions: Place students in groups and have them restate the following three statements in their own words. Afterwards, have the groups share their thoughts as a class. To reinforce the ideas, students can write an essay on one of the following discussion topics.

  1. “So it is possible that taking stimulants could increase one’s risk of developing PTSD when exposed to trauma… a study that will be published next month found that the escalating use of stimulants by the military in active duty soldiers, including those serving in Iraq and Afghanistan, was strongly correlated with an increase in the rates of PTSD, even when controlling for other factors, like the rate of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder.”

  2. “Some may view any attempt to tamper with human memory as disturbing because it seems at odds with what we ought to do as a culture with the darker aspects of our history: Never alter the facts, even if we have divergent interpretations of them.”

  3. “Some may also argue that it’s a mistake to tinker with our fear responses because they’re natural — they evolved this way for a reason. Like most other animals, we come hard-wired with a flight or fight response along with its associated anxiety and fear. Without this warning system to protect us from predators and other dangers, we’d have been dinner long ago on the savanna.”

3-2-1-Writing

Directions: Allow students 5 minutes to write down three new ideas they’ve learned about the topic from the reading,  two things they did not understand in the reading, and one thing they would like to know that the article did not mention. Review the responses as a class.

ANSWER KEY

Category: Medical

David Bowie: 1947-2016…An Enigma to the End!

“David Bowie, the infinitely changeable, fiercely forward-looking songwriter who taught generations of musicians about the power of drama, images and personas, died on Sunday, two days after his 69th birthday… Mr. Bowie wrote songs, above all, about being an outsider: an alien, a misfit, a faraway astronaut. His music was always a mutable blend — rock, cabaret, jazz and what he called “plastic soul” — but it was suffused with genuine soul.”J. Pareles,  The New York Times

ESL Voices Lesson Plan for this post with Answer Key

David Bowie, always mysterious.

David Bowie, always mysterious.

Excerpt: David Bowie…Transcended Music, Art and Fashion  By Jon Pareles NYT

“His death was confirmed by his publicist, Steve Martin, on Monday morning. No other details were provided. 

David Bowie. Photo-ACMI 2015 Winter Masterpieces exhibition

David Bowie. Photo-ACMI 2015 Winter Masterpieces exhibition

His last album, Blackstar, a collaboration with a jazz quartet that was typically enigmatic and exploratory, was released on Friday — his birthday…

David Bowie's Lazarus. rollingstone.com

David Bowie’s Lazarus. rollingstone.com

He had also collaborated on an Off Broadway musical Lazarus, which was a surreal sequel to the 1976 film that featured his definitive screen role, The Man Who Fell to Earth.

Bowie in The Man Who Fell to Earth 1076-Photodavidbowienews

In concerts and videos, Mr. Bowie’s costumes and imagery traversed styles, eras and continents, from German Expressionism to commedia dell’arte to Japanese kimonos to spacesuits. He set an example, and a challenge, for every arena spectacle in his wake…

Bowie and fiery Tina Turner.

Bowie and fiery Tina Turner.

Mr. Bowie earned admiration and emulation across the musical spectrum — from rockers, balladeers, punks, hip-hop acts… Mr. Bowie was married for more than 20 years to the international model Iman, with whom he had a daughter…

Bowie with his beautiful wife, model Iman, at the Council of Fashion Designers Awards 2002. Credit S. Plunkett, AP

Bowie with his beautiful wife, model Iman, at the Council of Fashion Designers Awards 2002. Credit S. Plunkett, AP

David Bowie's Blackstar album. officialcharts

David Bowie’s Blackstar album. officialcharts

His final albums were a glance back and a new excursion. And “Blackstar,” released two days before his death, had him backed by a volatile jazz-based quartet, in songs that contemplated fame, spirituality, death and, as always, startling transformations.”

 David Bowie 1947-2016

David Bowie 1947-2016

WE WILL MISS YOU…REST IN PEACE

Flowers

ESL VOICES

ESL Voices Lesson Plan for this post

NOTE: Lessons can also be used with native English speakers.

Level: Intermediate – Advanced


Language Skills: Reading, writing, and speaking. Vocabulary and grammar activities are included.


Time: Approximately 2 hours.


Materials: Student handout (from this lesson) and access to news article.


Objective: Students will read and discuss the article
with a focus on improving reading comprehension and learning new vocabulary. At the end of the lesson students will express their personal views on the topic through group work and writing.

I. Pre-Reading Activities

 Predictions: Analyzing headings and photos

Directions:  Have students  examine the titles of the post and of the actual article. After they examine the photos, ask students to create a list of  words and  ideas  that they think might be related to this article. 

II. While Reading Tasks

Word Inference

Directions: Students are to infer the meanings of the words in bold taken from the article. They may use a dictionary, thesaurus, and Word Chart for assistance.

  1. His last album was a collaboration with a jazz quartet.
  2. Bowie’s music has been described as enigmatic.
  3. In concerts  Mr. Bowie’s costumes and imagery traversed styles.
  4. If he had an anthem, it was Changes from his 1971 album.
  5. Mr. Bowie earned admiration and emulation from the world.
  6. Mr. Bowie  was known for his morphing persona.
  7. His message was that there was always empathy beyond difference.
  8. Mr. Bowie produced albums and wrote songs for some of his idols.
  9. Mr. Bowie was a person of relentless reinvention.
  10. Mr. Bowie had become a pioneer of glam rock.
Vocabulary Cluster By Learnnc.org

Vocabulary Cluster By Learnnc.org

Reading Comprehension

True /False/NA-Statements

Directions: Review the following statements from the reading.  If  a statement is true they mark it T. If the statement is  not applicable, they mark it NA. If the statement is false they  mark  it F and provide the correct answer. 

  1. David Bowie died at age 89.
  2. Mr. Bowie had been treated for cancer for the last 18 months.
  3. His last album, Blues   was a collaboration with a jazz quartet.
  4. Labyrinth was an off Broadway musical.
  5. Bowie is to be honored with a concert at Carnegie Hall on March 31.
  6. David had 5 children total.
  7. Mr. Bowie’s costumes and imagery traversed styles, eras and continents.
  8. Mr. Bowie produced albums and wrote songs for some of his idols.
  9. Mr. Bowie was married for more than  50 years to the model Iman.
  10. David Robert Jones is Bowie’s real name.

 Grammar Focus: Prepositions

Directions: The following sentences are from the news article.  For each sentence choose the correct preposition from the choices listed above. Note that not all prepositions listed are in the article.

Prepositions:  in, for, of, with, by,  on, at, to, as,  into, across, around, over,  through, from, during, up, off,

He became a lasting influence___Mr. Bowie, focusing his interest ___movement. He moved ___the United States ___1974. For a far-reaching change ___environment, and to get away ___drugs, Mr. Bowie moved ___1976 ___ Switzerland. Working ___Mr. Eno and Mr. Bowie’s collaborator ___decades, was the producer Tony Visconti. The Next Day, released ___2013, returned ___ something like the glam-rock sound ___his 1970s guitar bands.

III. Post Reading Tasks

WH-How Questions

Directions: Have students use the  WH-question format to discuss or to write the main points from the article.

Who or What is the article about?

Where does the action/event take place?

When does the action/event take place?

Why did the action/event occur?

How did the action/event occur?

Discussion/Writing Exercise

Directions: Place students in groups and have them  rephrase the following statement.  Afterwards, have the groups share their thoughts as a class. To reinforce the ideas, students can write an essay on one of the following discussion topics.

“Mr. Bowie earned admiration and emulation across the musical spectrum — from rockers, balladeers, punks, hip-hop acts, creators of pop spectacles and even classical composers.”

1-Minute Free Writing Exercise

Directions: Allow students 1 minute to write down one new idea they’ve learned from the reading. Ask them to write down one thing they did not understand in the reading.  Review the responses as a class. Note: For the lower levels allow more time for this writing activity.

ANSWER KEY

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